muni_generic.jpgAccording to a release sent by the transit agency, the SFMTA has officially approved the permanent implementation of the Nx Judah Express Bus during commute hours, as well as additional service for the F Market line.

The Nx, a Muni bus line intended to supplement the service of the often-packed (40,000 daily riders, says Muni, which adds up to about 30% of Muni’s ridership) N Judah, was as you might recall proposed as a six-month trial.

The $1.8 million bus line started running every 10 minutes on weekdays at peak Judah-riding hours during the morning and afternoon commute this June.

Just a few weeks later, Muni transit chief John Haley declared the line a success, which is probably one of the reasons that at yesterday’s SFMTA Board meeting, they voted to make the Nx Judah permanent.

Says Chairman of the Board of Directors Tom Nolan in a statement, “The N Line is a real workhorse for Muni and we want to make sure that we can accommodate the large ridership. Prior to the pilot, crowded peak period conditions led to pass-ups and reliability issues. The Board is pleased to see targeted efforts to improve Muni service systemwide.”

“Because passenger demand has continued to be high in the last half hour of the afternoon service,” the MTA says in a statement “the Nx hours will be expanded by 30 minutes to 7 p.m., effective January 23.”

The board also voted to increase the frequency of service on the F Market line by 26%. The F Market is a popular streetcar line for tourists and locals alike and will now be operating every five minutes instead of seven in an attempt to reduce the crowding on the streetcars, as well as pass-ups (that is, when a crowded bus, train, or trolley won’t even let you get on because it’s too packed) on the line.

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the author

Always in motion. April Siese writes about music, takes photos at shows, and even helps put them on behind the scenes as a stagehand. She's written everything from hard news to beauty features, as well as fiction and poetry. She most definitely likes pie.

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  • Erik

    The most expensive band-aid.

  • Erik

    The most expensive band-aid.

  • turtle276

    As a daily N Judah rider, I can attest that the Nx bus is actually making a difference in the crowding, especially in the morning. I do agree however, that this seems like an expensive band-aid. What is the real reason that Muni does not simply add more N street cars? Is it a lack of equipment or trained drivers? I thought I read somewhere that due to some union rule, trained streetcar operators cannot be hired from outside the system, leading to a shortage of operators qualified to drive the trains.

    Also, does the N really represent 30% of Muni’s total ridership? Does that include bus lines like the 38, 14, 1?

  • turtle276

    As a daily N Judah rider, I can attest that the Nx bus is actually making a difference in the crowding, especially in the morning. I do agree however, that this seems like an expensive band-aid. What is the real reason that Muni does not simply add more N street cars? Is it a lack of equipment or trained drivers? I thought I read somewhere that due to some union rule, trained streetcar operators cannot be hired from outside the system, leading to a shortage of operators qualified to drive the trains.

    Also, does the N really represent 30% of Muni’s total ridership? Does that include bus lines like the 38, 14, 1?

  • Alex Zepeda

    As of about 2008, no. The N accounted for almost 7% of all ridership, and about 25% of all streetcar ridership. The Mission corridor sees about 6%, the Geary (2, 38, 38L, 38AX, 38BX) corridor sees about 9% of all Muni ridership.

    The data are on the MTA’s web site under the TEP filings.

  • Alex Zepeda

    As of about 2008, no. The N accounted for almost 7% of all ridership, and about 25% of all streetcar ridership. The Mission corridor sees about 6%, the Geary (2, 38, 38L, 38AX, 38BX) corridor sees about 9% of all Muni ridership.

    The data are on the MTA’s web site under the TEP filings.