ccsf.jpgFaculty, staff and students from City College of San Francisco are holding a meeting this evening to try to encourage community members to join their fight in the school’s struggle to stay accredited, an organizer said.

The meeting of the Save CCSF Coalition is scheduled for 6 p.m. on City College’s Mission Campus, according to Bob Price, a chemistry professor at the school and an organizer with the coalition.

City College faces a March 15 deadline set by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, which last July placed the school on “show cause” status, citing problems with 14 aspects of the school.

School officials are being asked to file a report by the March deadline showing that they are taking significant steps to address the problems identified by the commission, which included having too many campuses and excessive non-instructional faculty costs.

If City College fails to show improvement, it could have its accreditation revoked and be closed when the commission issues its ruling June 10.

The coalition is fighting against moves made by the school’s administration to dismantle City College’s department chair structure and replace them with deans, while consolidating certain departments and assigning department chairs back to full-time instructional roles.

“Everything’s going toward a top-down model,” Price said. “I think that’s a recipe for lowering the quality of the programs.”

He said “austerity measures” proposed by the administration don’t make sense given the approval by San Francisco voters of Proposition A last November to help fund City College.

“Education is needed now more than ever,” Price said. “We shouldn’t be cutting things.”
He said he hopes community members come out to today’s meeting to provide input on the various issues facing the school.

“So many San Franciscans have been affected by City College,” Price said, noting that 72 percent of voters approved Proposition A “so we know we have a lot of allies out there.”

The meeting will be held at 6 p.m. in Room 109 at the Mission Campus at 1125 Valencia St.

Dan McMenamin, Bay City News

Want more news, sent to your inbox every day? Then how about subscribing to our email newsletter? Here’s why we think you should. Come on, give it a try.

Please make sure your comment adheres to our comment policy. If it doesn't, it may be deleted. Repeat violations may cause us to revoke your commenting privileges. No one wants that!
  • Grace

    The proposed changes looks reasonable to me. Faculty member should be teaching classes. If a faculty member like to become a dean or to manage people, he should apply to become a dean. Once become a dean, he will realize that his position is not as secure as a teaching position. His decisions will be held accountable. He can get fired if he consistently make bad decisions.

    73% of SF voters voted to give me money to CCSF. That is because CCSF is a large school with many students, staff members, and alumni living in the city. The college has been around for 75 years. Many SF residents attended the college at some point in the lives. The school bears the city’s name, so no SF resident would want CCSF to go under. The SF homeowners are being out-numbered by students and alumni. That is how Proposition A passed. Many homeowners are retired people with very modest means. An additional $75 per year is a burden to them.

    Putting some of the Prop A money into a reserve is also reasonable. The college needs the money for deferred maintenance, both physical structure and information structure.

  • Grace

    The proposed changes looks reasonable to me. Faculty member should be teaching classes. If a faculty member like to become a dean or to manage people, he should apply to become a dean. Once become a dean, he will realize that his position is not as secure as a teaching position. His decisions will be held accountable. He can get fired if he consistently make bad decisions.

    73% of SF voters voted to give me money to CCSF. That is because CCSF is a large school with many students, staff members, and alumni living in the city. The college has been around for 75 years. Many SF residents attended the college at some point in the lives. The school bears the city’s name, so no SF resident would want CCSF to go under. The SF homeowners are being out-numbered by students and alumni. That is how Proposition A passed. Many homeowners are retired people with very modest means. An additional $75 per year is a burden to them.

    Putting some of the Prop A money into a reserve is also reasonable. The college needs the money for deferred maintenance, both physical structure and information structure.

  • Ludicrous2

    He said “austerity measures” proposed by the administration don’t make sense given the approval by San Francisco voters of Proposition A last November to help fund City College.

    THIS IS WHY THE LAYOFFS ARE OCCURRING. ENROLLMENT IS DOWN. THIS HAPPENED AFTER THE ACCJC REPORT CAME OUT.

    City College needs about 3,000 full- and part-time students to register for the spring semester – and fast. If not, the school expects to lose $6.5 million in state funding, which is tied to enrollment.

    Price said, noting that 72 percent of voters approved Proposition A “so we know we have a lot of allies out there.”

    Have you ever read the book called ‘How to Lie with Statistics’. Only 66% of the registered voters voted for the Local Parcel Tax. Prop 30 was 69% of the registered voters. This is what happens when people don’t care and do not vote.

    BOB PRICE, A CHEMISTRY PROFESSOR AT THE SCHOOL AND AN ORGANIZER WITH THE COALITION SHOULD GET HIS FACTS RIGHT BEFORE YOU MISSPEAK. PEOPLE LIKE YOU AND WENDY KAUFMYN ARE SCARY.

  • Ludicrous2

    He said “austerity measures” proposed by the administration don’t make sense given the approval by San Francisco voters of Proposition A last November to help fund City College.

    THIS IS WHY THE LAYOFFS ARE OCCURRING. ENROLLMENT IS DOWN. THIS HAPPENED AFTER THE ACCJC REPORT CAME OUT.

    City College needs about 3,000 full- and part-time students to register for the spring semester – and fast. If not, the school expects to lose $6.5 million in state funding, which is tied to enrollment.

    Price said, noting that 72 percent of voters approved Proposition A “so we know we have a lot of allies out there.”

    Have you ever read the book called ‘How to Lie with Statistics’. Only 66% of the registered voters voted for the Local Parcel Tax. Prop 30 was 69% of the registered voters. This is what happens when people don’t care and do not vote.

    BOB PRICE, A CHEMISTRY PROFESSOR AT THE SCHOOL AND AN ORGANIZER WITH THE COALITION SHOULD GET HIS FACTS RIGHT BEFORE YOU MISSPEAK. PEOPLE LIKE YOU AND WENDY KAUFMYN ARE SCARY.

  • Ludicrous2

    He said “austerity measures” proposed by the administration don’t make sense given the approval by San Francisco voters of Proposition A last November to help fund City College.

    THIS IS WHY THE LAYOFFS ARE OCCURRING. ENROLLMENT IS DOWN. THIS HAPPENED AFTER THE ACCJC REPORT CAME OUT.

    City College needs about 3,000 full- and part-time students to register for the spring semester – and fast. If not, the school expects to lose $6.5 million in state funding, which is tied to enrollment.

    Price said, noting that 72 percent of voters approved Proposition A “so we know we have a lot of allies out there.”

    Have you ever read the book called ‘How to Lie with Statistics’. Only 66% of the registered voters voted for the Local Parcel Tax. Prop 30 was 69% of the registered voters. This is what happens when people don’t care and do not vote.

    BOB PRICE, A CHEMISTRY PROFESSOR AT THE SCHOOL AND AN ORGANIZER WITH THE COALITION SHOULD GET HIS FACTS RIGHT BEFORE YOU MISSPEAK. PEOPLE LIKE YOU AND WENDY KAUFMYN ARE SCARY.

  • Ludicrous2

    He said “austerity measures” proposed by the administration don’t make sense given the approval by San Francisco voters of Proposition A last November to help fund City College.

    THIS IS WHY THE LAYOFFS ARE OCCURRING. ENROLLMENT IS DOWN. THIS HAPPENED AFTER THE ACCJC REPORT CAME OUT.

    City College needs about 3,000 full- and part-time students to register for the spring semester – and fast. If not, the school expects to lose $6.5 million in state funding, which is tied to enrollment.

    Price said, noting that 72 percent of voters approved Proposition A “so we know we have a lot of allies out there.”

    Have you ever read the book called ‘How to Lie with Statistics’. Only 66% of the registered voters voted for the Local Parcel Tax. Prop 30 was 69% of the registered voters. This is what happens when people don’t care and do not vote.

    BOB PRICE, A CHEMISTRY PROFESSOR AT THE SCHOOL AND AN ORGANIZER WITH THE COALITION SHOULD GET HIS FACTS RIGHT BEFORE YOU MISSPEAK. PEOPLE LIKE YOU AND WENDY KAUFMYN ARE SCARY.