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This is a revised and corrected version of a story published at 2:39 AM (see below) which contained incorrect background information about the Aarti Hotel.

5:36 PM: The Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corporation, a San Francisco nonprofit dedicated to providing low-income housing and support services, announced Monday that it has been awarded a $450,000 grant for renovations to the Aarti Hotel.

The hotel, located at 391 Leavenworth St., is currently closed and will reopen this fall.
It will provide housing and mental health services for young people between the ages of 18 and 24 who are coming out of foster care and suffer from mental health issues.

It will be run by through a partnership between TNDC and Larkin Street Youth Services in which TNDC will serve as building managers and Larkin Street Youth Services will provide mental health services to its occupants.

The grant came from NeighborWorks America, a nationwide network of more than 235 nonprofit organizations that help provide affordable housing and foster community development. In all, $34.9 million was awarded to 115 NeighborWorks organizations.

The grants awarded to TNDC will go toward replacing the Aarti Hotel’s windows and hallway light fixtures, repainting the hallways and the building’s exterior, replacing the roof, and renovation work within the residential units.

TNDC has purchased and developed dozens of properties throughout the Tenderloin and surrounding neighborhoods to provide relief from poverty, homelessness and mental illness.

Founded in 1981, TNDC also provides services including social workers, after-school programs and help with community organizing.

2:39 AM: Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corporation, or TNDC, a San Francisco nonprofit dedicated to providing low-income housing and support services, announced Monday that it was awarded a $450,000 grant for renovations to the Aarti Hotel.

The hotel, located at 391 Leavenworth St., is operated by TNDC and provides affordable housing to 40 formerly homeless and mentally ill individuals.

The grant came from NeighborWorks America, a nationwide network of 235 nonprofit organizations providing affordable housing and community development. In all, $34.93 million was awarded to 115 NeighborWorks organizations.

The grants awarded to TNDC will replace all of the Aarti Hotel’s windows and hallway light fixtures, repaint the hallways and the building’s exterior, replace the roof, and allow for additional renovation work within the residential units.

The hotel is run by TNDC in collaboration with Conard House, a San Francisco organization that promotes self-management for mentally ill individuals. TNDC owns and operates the building and Conard House provides staff to provide care for the residents’ mental illnesses.

TNDC has purchased and developed dozens of properties throughout the Tenderloin neighborhood and surrounding neighborhoods to provide relief from poverty, homelessness and mental illness.

Founded in 1981, TNDC also provides support services, including social workers, after school programs and community organizing, for one of San Francisco’s most disadvantaged populations.

Scott Morris, Bay City News

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  • DT

    TNDC needs to stop concentrating their services in the TL. They serve to attract too many out-of-towners for handouts and congest the neighborhood with mentally ill and addicts. The TL is too close to tourist attractions, and the TNDC’s clients are off-putting to tourists, who are the prime industry in SF.

  • DT

    TNDC needs to stop concentrating their services in the TL. They serve to attract too many out-of-towners for handouts and congest the neighborhood with mentally ill and addicts. The TL is too close to tourist attractions, and the TNDC’s clients are off-putting to tourists, who are the prime industry in SF.