bart_generic.jpgAlthough construction starts the first of April, this is not an April Fool’s joke: BART says they will be “modernizing” SF’s Powell St. station in a big way: ceiling sound baffles will be removed and replaced, walls will be knocked down for circulation, signs will be brighter, and the station will be safer for lungs, with the removal of asbestos, and for the slip and fall prone, with new waterproofing.

The asbestos issue is why, they say “passengers may see workers entering and exiting the station area in protective clothing.” It’s totally not some sketchy government op, a la the last act of ET.

Some of the project will be going on during service hours, but they say that it “should not interfere with customer access.” Construction superfans might be disappointed, though: all work will all be done under the cover of plywood walls and mobile modules.

BART claims that workers are hidden behind these for their and our safety, which makes you wonder who’s more dangerous: the riders or the people who build for them?

Conspiracy theorists may also note that the 20 month station station modernization project won’t complete until the winter of 2012, potentially ushering in the end of days.

If you have any questions about the project, you can reach BART representative John Gee directly at: jgee@bart.gov and (510) 287-4928

Want more news, sent to your inbox every day? Then how about subscribing to our email newsletter? Here’s why we think you should. Come on, give it a try.

the author

Always in motion. April Siese writes about music, takes photos at shows, and even helps put them on behind the scenes as a stagehand. She's written everything from hard news to beauty features, as well as fiction and poetry. She most definitely likes pie.

Please make sure your comment adheres to our comment policy. If it doesn't, it may be deleted. Repeat violations may cause us to revoke your commenting privileges. No one wants that!
  • SonjaKathryna

    The Bay Area has been so proactive about removing asbestos in the community, and this is great to read. Safe and well-regulated asbestos removal can be a lengthy and expensive project; however, when done properly, it saves lives. I work for an asbestos related cancer resource center – http://www.MesoRC.com/ – and have witnessed the devastating effects of asbestos exposure firsthand. Please educate others about the dangers of this deadly mineral and support those working to remove it. Regards, SK