star-siren-book.jpgI’ve heard from folks around town that the hospitals that border Pac Heights have a strict “no siren” policy, because of conditional use permits (or something) from the City. Is that really true? I live in the Western Addition and hear ambulances all night driving to UCSF Davies, even on empty vacant streets.

No, it’s not true. “Anytime we are transporting or responding to an incident, sirens are required,” said Mindy Talmadge,The SF Fire Department’s public information officer, “regardless of the neighborhood.”

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  • bloomsm

    This might be the official policy but if you live near a firehouse in a residential area, often they refrain from hitting the siren until they reach the end of the block. And, having once traveled in an ambulance after an injury, they do indeed lay off the sirens whenever not necessary. The driver mentioned that sirens tend to spook other cars and so, while there’s no formal policy of laying off the siren, it occurs in practice.

  • bloomsm

    This might be the official policy but if you live near a firehouse in a residential area, often they refrain from hitting the siren until they reach the end of the block. And, having once traveled in an ambulance after an injury, they do indeed lay off the sirens whenever not necessary. The driver mentioned that sirens tend to spook other cars and so, while there’s no formal policy of laying off the siren, it occurs in practice.