gay_cityhall_gavel.jpg

Updates below!

1:13 PM: AP is reporting that the request by several media outlets to broadcast the closing arguments in the trial challenging California’s same sex marriage ban has been denied.

Chief U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker issued a notice today saying that the closing arguments in the case challenging Prop 8’s constitutionality, currently scheduled for June 16, “will not be transmitted” (that’s TV or internet broadcast) outside the courthouse.

As you might recall, Walker had agreed to allow the trial to be streamed and posted in real-time on YouTube. At that time, the U.S. Supreme Court blocked the broadcasts at the request of Proposition 8’s sponsors.

10:07 PM: According to the Peninsula Press Club, “a court official…mistakenly posted what appeared to be a ruling” on the broadcast decision, but that in actuality, no decision’s been made.

So, yay, you still have plenty of time to agree and/ordebate with blooms in the comments on whether or not the trial’s closing arguments should be transmitted to the masses.

the author

Eve Batey is the editor and publisher of the San Francisco Appeal. She used to be the San Francisco Chronicle's Deputy Managing Editor for Online, and started at the Chronicle as their blogging and interactive editor. Before that, she was a co-founding writer and the lead editor of SFist. She's been in the city since 1997, presently living in the Outer Sunset with her husband, cat, and dog. You can reach Eve at eve@sfappeal.com.

Please make sure your comment adheres to our comment policy. If it doesn't, it may be deleted. Repeat violations may cause us to revoke your commenting privileges. No one wants that!
  • bloomsm

    Cameras in the courtroom are a bad idea. Remember what a circus the OJ trial became. Why? Lawyers have enormous egos and the consensus is that the judicial process is not well-served by people putting on a show for the camera. There are transcripts and pool reporters to find out what is occurring inside.

  • bloomsm

    And I hasten to add, it’s not a “win” for the pro-Prop 8 side, it’s a “win” for the judicial system, which needs cameras in the courtroom about as much as the Hall of Justice needs sewage in the basement.