It’s a diamond life over here in the Richmond…

In honor of Cupid’s holiday and the old saying that diamonds are a girl’s best friend, we’re giving away free tickets to the Cartier and America exhibition at the Legion of Honor. Stop by, answer a little trivia and by early next week, you may have the solution to “What the heck are we doing for Valentine’s Day?!?!?”

We got a sneak peek this week of the stylin’ apartments and townhomes that will be opening up in the former hospital inside the 15th Avenue Presidio gate. Move over Sea Cliff – the Presidio Landmark may have you beat with stainless steel fixtures, radiant heating, in-building fitness and yoga centers, an unbeatable backyard and killer views of the entire Richmond District. Personally I’m awaiting an invitation for the blog office to relocate there, rent-free of course.

Looking for new breakfast digs? Head over to Clement and 2nd Avenue to try out the new and improved “Eats”. The first reviews are in and it sounds promising. Chicken and waffles, baby!

Last week I got news that a long-running tradition in Golden Gate Park is being squashed by the mercurial Rec & Park Department. Since ’88, Jimmy’s Old Car Picnic has been filling up Speedway Meadow one day a year with classic cars and hot rods, all while raising money for developmentally disabled kids. It was even started by a former GGP gardener and in 2006, the Board of Supervisors gave Jimmy’s Old Car Picnic a proclamation celebrating the picnic and its charitable contributions. So what’s changed? Rec and Park’s bank balance, that’s what. Find out how you can help keep the event in the park.

This Saturday, the Chinese Lion Dancers will be out at the Richmond Library from 12:30 til 1:30. For a preview, check out the video I shot of them along Clement Street last year as they blessed merchants’ storefronts. Snap, crackle, POP!

Have a great weekend everyone!

Sarah B.
Richmondsfblog.com | Follow us on: Twitter | Facebook

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  • Wainwright

    There is no more appropriate venue for the Picnic than the meadows of Golden Gate Park. A picnic in a parking lot or on a closed street is not a picnic. The proposed alternate locations have severe problems — like no bathrooms, no BBQ facilities, and inadequate parking for spectators. Some are very close to busy roadways which present a danger to the many children who attend the event and are allowed to run and play and explore on the safety of the meadow, and some of the proposed alternates simply don’t have the capacity for more than 20-25% of the number of cars that normally attend the Picnic. About half the regular attendees walk to the Picnic from their homes in the Richmond and Sunset Districts and from the Haight District — moving the event from the Park will mean that most of these people, who have attended the Picnic annually for many years, wll simply be unable to attend again. The suggested alternate sites all separate the picnic area from the area where the old cars would be parked, which creates difficulty for those with physical disabilities or who have difficulty walking long distances due to age or infirmity who want to both enjoy the picnic and check out the cars. The existing and traditional site does not require closing any roads and there is more than ample parking within a few minutes’ walk. It has bathroom and BBQ facilities, is safe for children, and is accessible for the disabled.

    Golden Gate Park was created in order to be used and enjoyed by the residents of San Francisco and their guests. John McLaren (1846-1943), known as the “Father of Golden Gate Park” and one of the Park’s first superintendants, before he would agree to undertake the job of superintendant, famously required that “There will be no ‘Keep off the Grass’ signs.” It is true that use of a park by members of the public will cause a certain amount of wear and tear, and that some maintenance will occasionally be required. But a park is not a preservation area. A park is there to be used and enjoyed by members of the public. The job of the supervisors is not to protect the park against any damage that might occur (they might as well just rope off all the meadows and require people to walk only on marked trails and not allow them to walk on grassy areas or near trees), but to manage the park so the public can enjoy it, understanding that this means there will be more maintenance than if no one were allowed in the park.

    There are no studies showing that the once-a-year parking of cars on the meadow causes any compaction issue at all. Even the few people who were at the hearing who expressed concern about the Picnic possibly having an adverse effect on plants limited their concern to driving over and parking on tree roots, and agreed that the turf is resiliant and is not endangered by the Picnic. There aren’t very many trees in Speedway Meadow, and careful planning can easily avoid exposing tree roots to potential damage.

    Jimmy’s Old Car Picnic, a home-grown, organic San Francisco tradition, started by a Golden Gate Park gardener, should be allowed to continue in its traditional location!

  • Wainwright

    There is no more appropriate venue for the Picnic than the meadows of Golden Gate Park. A picnic in a parking lot or on a closed street is not a picnic. The proposed alternate locations have severe problems — like no bathrooms, no BBQ facilities, and inadequate parking for spectators. Some are very close to busy roadways which present a danger to the many children who attend the event and are allowed to run and play and explore on the safety of the meadow, and some of the proposed alternates simply don’t have the capacity for more than 20-25% of the number of cars that normally attend the Picnic. About half the regular attendees walk to the Picnic from their homes in the Richmond and Sunset Districts and from the Haight District — moving the event from the Park will mean that most of these people, who have attended the Picnic annually for many years, wll simply be unable to attend again. The suggested alternate sites all separate the picnic area from the area where the old cars would be parked, which creates difficulty for those with physical disabilities or who have difficulty walking long distances due to age or infirmity who want to both enjoy the picnic and check out the cars. The existing and traditional site does not require closing any roads and there is more than ample parking within a few minutes’ walk. It has bathroom and BBQ facilities, is safe for children, and is accessible for the disabled.

    Golden Gate Park was created in order to be used and enjoyed by the residents of San Francisco and their guests. John McLaren (1846-1943), known as the “Father of Golden Gate Park” and one of the Park’s first superintendants, before he would agree to undertake the job of superintendant, famously required that “There will be no ‘Keep off the Grass’ signs.” It is true that use of a park by members of the public will cause a certain amount of wear and tear, and that some maintenance will occasionally be required. But a park is not a preservation area. A park is there to be used and enjoyed by members of the public. The job of the supervisors is not to protect the park against any damage that might occur (they might as well just rope off all the meadows and require people to walk only on marked trails and not allow them to walk on grassy areas or near trees), but to manage the park so the public can enjoy it, understanding that this means there will be more maintenance than if no one were allowed in the park.

    There are no studies showing that the once-a-year parking of cars on the meadow causes any compaction issue at all. Even the few people who were at the hearing who expressed concern about the Picnic possibly having an adverse effect on plants limited their concern to driving over and parking on tree roots, and agreed that the turf is resiliant and is not endangered by the Picnic. There aren’t very many trees in Speedway Meadow, and careful planning can easily avoid exposing tree roots to potential damage.

    Jimmy’s Old Car Picnic, a home-grown, organic San Francisco tradition, started by a Golden Gate Park gardener, should be allowed to continue in its traditional location!