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Tuesday, 2/2/10



8:55 AM: In what SFPD is describing as a “possible gang-related incident,” an undescribed suspect reportedly drove up next to an undescribed victim’s car at 3rd and Williams, started a conversation, then pulled out a gun and allegedly shot the victim. The injury from the shooting wasn’t life threatening, and no one was arrested.

3:30 PM: Two men reportedly got in a fight on the 200 block of Turk, and a third man attempted to break up the fight. He was struck with a chair, suffering life threatening injuries. His alleged assailant was arrested.

3:30 PM: Four women reportedly assaulted a fifth woman at 24th and Mission in what SFPD is describing as a “possible gang-related incident.” Non-life-threatening injury, and no one was arrested.

4:30 PM: A “large group” of men and women reportedly assaulted another group at 14th and Natoma. This crime is not being described as gang-related, which is surprising because from the slender description we have, it sure sounds gangy! In the tussle a woman was stabbed, then the suspects fled on foot. The victim’s stab wounds weren’t life threatening, and no one’s been arrested.

5:30: A woman stole a man’s bike, at gunpoint, at Font and Arballo. The victim followed the suspect and called police, who arrested the alleged bike thief, and returned the man’s bike to him.

7 PM: Two undescribed suspects reportedly demanded money from a victim while on Muni. When the victim shoved one of the suspects away, the suspect stabbed the victim, then both suspects robbed the victim and fled the bus at Mission and Silver. The victim went to SF General with a non life threatening injury. No one was arrested.

7:20 PM: A man and woman reportedly got into a physical altercation on the 2000 block of San Bruno, leading to the man’s arrest.

7:25 PM: A man reportedly knocked a woman to the ground and stole her purse at 2nd and Natoma. No arrest.

7:30 PM: A man reportedly punched a woman in the face and robbed her at Beale and Folsom. The suspect fled on foot, and hasn’t been arrested.

Wednesday, 2/3/10

12:20 AM: A man and woman reportedly got into a physical fight on the 400 block of Mission, and the man was arrested.

the author

Eve Batey is the editor and publisher of the San Francisco Appeal. She used to be the San Francisco Chronicle's Deputy Managing Editor for Online, and started at the Chronicle as their blogging and interactive editor. Before that, she was a co-founding writer and the lead editor of SFist. She's been in the city since 1997, presently living in the Outer Sunset with her husband, cat, and dog. You can reach Eve at eve@sfappeal.com.

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  • seth22

    Though I might catch hell for this one, someone needs to explain to me again how reporting the gender of a suspect is different from reporting the race of a suspect. They are both facts and descriptions at their most basic level, no?

    BTW, gangy is now added to my vernacular.

  • seth22

    Though I might catch hell for this one, someone needs to explain to me again how reporting the gender of a suspect is different from reporting the race of a suspect. They are both facts and descriptions at their most basic level, no?

    BTW, gangy is now added to my vernacular.

  • modelenoir

    Here were my feelings about it in reply to someone on 1/25’s blotter. Do you feel it’s a valid point?

    from: http://sfappeal.com/news/2010/01/crime-blotter-monday-jan-25-pacific-heights-hot-prowl-north-beach-gang-fight-serious-shooting-at-16t-comments.php

    Wil: “/me waits for someone to complain that mentioning the gender of involved parties is sexist.”

    Modelenoir: “The argument to exclude race was less an issue of political correctness and more about overall relevancy. Eve included the race of an individual in Friday’s blotter (http://sfappeal.com/news/2010/01/crime-blotter-friday-jan-22-north-beach-street-fight.php) because it was complemented with more information. From what I gather race will be excluded unless the writer feels it otherwise important to include.

    In terms of sentence construction, using “man” or “woman” instead of “person” does nothing to the overall sentence. It doesn’t add anything extra to the sentence. Race was being used as an adjective, and the debate was more about its inclusion being irrelevant unless complemented by other information. That’s only the argument against “man” or “woman” being contextually fine to leave in.

    The argument that adding “man” or “woman” could somehow be sexist has yet to be brought up by anyone that feels offended. The issue has been brought up in a slippery-slope context, but not as an issue in itself. I’d be interested to hear someone’s opinion if they think that gender is not only unnecessary, but actually detrimental to the blotter, much in the same way the race issue was debated.

    Peace.”

    Peace.

  • modelenoir

    Here were my feelings about it in reply to someone on 1/25’s blotter. Do you feel it’s a valid point?

    from: http://sfappeal.com/news/2010/01/crime-blotter-monday-jan-25-pacific-heights-hot-prowl-north-beach-gang-fight-serious-shooting-at-16t-comments.php

    Wil: “/me waits for someone to complain that mentioning the gender of involved parties is sexist.”

    Modelenoir: “The argument to exclude race was less an issue of political correctness and more about overall relevancy. Eve included the race of an individual in Friday’s blotter (http://sfappeal.com/news/2010/01/crime-blotter-friday-jan-22-north-beach-street-fight.php) because it was complemented with more information. From what I gather race will be excluded unless the writer feels it otherwise important to include.

    In terms of sentence construction, using “man” or “woman” instead of “person” does nothing to the overall sentence. It doesn’t add anything extra to the sentence. Race was being used as an adjective, and the debate was more about its inclusion being irrelevant unless complemented by other information. That’s only the argument against “man” or “woman” being contextually fine to leave in.

    The argument that adding “man” or “woman” could somehow be sexist has yet to be brought up by anyone that feels offended. The issue has been brought up in a slippery-slope context, but not as an issue in itself. I’d be interested to hear someone’s opinion if they think that gender is not only unnecessary, but actually detrimental to the blotter, much in the same way the race issue was debated.

    Peace.”

    Peace.

  • Eve Batey

    Tomorrow, as an experiment, I will not refer to folks by gender-based pronoun, but by a rotating gallery of ungendered slang terms for their race. Urban dictionary, here I come!

  • Eve Batey

    Tomorrow, as an experiment, I will not refer to folks by gender-based pronoun, but by a rotating gallery of ungendered slang terms for their race. Urban dictionary, here I come!

  • modelenoir

    awesome.

  • modelenoir

    awesome.

  • seth22

    @modelenoir: I do see your point from a literary POV; race doesn’t add anything substantive to the story. I guess I’m of the opinion, for good or for ill, that the more (true) facts a news report lists in a story, the more confident I can be in its accuracy. All that race is to me is another fact. It is no different to me than this apt example: many reports describe what a suspect was wearing. This is arguably more superfluous because, by the time the story is published, the crook is sure to have changed his/her clothes (my favorite is “black hoodie”; everyone I know, myself included, owns one of those). I still like having the info though, useless or not.
    At the end of the day though, I’m happy to merely be informed blotter style, regardless of the depth to which a perp is described.

    @Eve Batey: That’s awesome. You should try alliterative color/crime pairs, e.g. “a lily-white larcenist,” “alabaster arsonist,” or “milk chocolate mugger.”

  • seth22

    @modelenoir: I do see your point from a literary POV; race doesn’t add anything substantive to the story. I guess I’m of the opinion, for good or for ill, that the more (true) facts a news report lists in a story, the more confident I can be in its accuracy. All that race is to me is another fact. It is no different to me than this apt example: many reports describe what a suspect was wearing. This is arguably more superfluous because, by the time the story is published, the crook is sure to have changed his/her clothes (my favorite is “black hoodie”; everyone I know, myself included, owns one of those). I still like having the info though, useless or not.
    At the end of the day though, I’m happy to merely be informed blotter style, regardless of the depth to which a perp is described.

    @Eve Batey: That’s awesome. You should try alliterative color/crime pairs, e.g. “a lily-white larcenist,” “alabaster arsonist,” or “milk chocolate mugger.”

  • Eve Batey

    AHEM! “Milk chocolate ALLEGED mugger,” please.

  • Eve Batey

    AHEM! “Milk chocolate ALLEGED mugger,” please.

  • raqcoon

    Interesting how a gat-toting woman stole a dude’s ride. You’d think an hombre would be the thief.

  • raqcoon

    Interesting how a gat-toting woman stole a dude’s ride. You’d think an hombre would be the thief.

  • jujube

    Ms. Batey, these crime blotters are becoming less informative and by extension less useful without details such as the color of the car or the race of the suspects. I realize that often times we may not have complete information but if a journalist is to serve his/her primary function as disseminating objective news in serving the community then leaving out very much pertinent information just to avoid stereotypes is a disservice to all.

  • jujube

    Ms. Batey, these crime blotters are becoming less informative and by extension less useful without details such as the color of the car or the race of the suspects. I realize that often times we may not have complete information but if a journalist is to serve his/her primary function as disseminating objective news in serving the community then leaving out very much pertinent information just to avoid stereotypes is a disservice to all.

  • Eve Batey

    jujube, anyone who reads the Appeal regularly should know better than to think that lecturing me on what you think a journalists’ “primary function” should be will get you anything besides an offer to refund the money you’re spending to read this site.

    But I promise you that whatever happens, if and when SFPD provides us with the color of a car, we will provide it to you! And, please, call me “Eve.”

  • Eve Batey

    jujube, anyone who reads the Appeal regularly should know better than to think that lecturing me on what you think a journalists’ “primary function” should be will get you anything besides an offer to refund the money you’re spending to read this site.

    But I promise you that whatever happens, if and when SFPD provides us with the color of a car, we will provide it to you! And, please, call me “Eve.”

  • seth22

    I didn’t mean to start another “thing” with this. I’m just fascinated, sociologically if you will, with the fact that individuals disfavor classifying people by certain innate, genetic characteristics rather than others (much in the same way constitutional jurisprudence treats the immutable characteristics of race and gender differently for the purposes of analyzing laws that classify people on those bases).

    It’s your site Eve, report what you want, how you want.

  • seth22

    I didn’t mean to start another “thing” with this. I’m just fascinated, sociologically if you will, with the fact that individuals disfavor classifying people by certain innate, genetic characteristics rather than others (much in the same way constitutional jurisprudence treats the immutable characteristics of race and gender differently for the purposes of analyzing laws that classify people on those bases).

    It’s your site Eve, report what you want, how you want.

  • modelenoir

    Kinda with you, though I’d disagree that gender and race are equal innate genetic characteristics, sociologically anyway. They’re issues that can be discussed together, but are very different issues. Neither is less or more important, simply different, and equating them to each other, sociologically, does neither issue justice… especially when in the context of crime.

    Anyway, the sociological aspect isn’t a discussion that I’m excited to have on the internet. If someone really thinks knowing the race of every person included in the blotter is helpful to them, I’m not going to argue. I just don’t see any value in including it.

    I’m with you though, I’ll keep reading either way. Looking forward to today’s experiment.

  • modelenoir

    Kinda with you, though I’d disagree that gender and race are equal innate genetic characteristics, sociologically anyway. They’re issues that can be discussed together, but are very different issues. Neither is less or more important, simply different, and equating them to each other, sociologically, does neither issue justice… especially when in the context of crime.

    Anyway, the sociological aspect isn’t a discussion that I’m excited to have on the internet. If someone really thinks knowing the race of every person included in the blotter is helpful to them, I’m not going to argue. I just don’t see any value in including it.

    I’m with you though, I’ll keep reading either way. Looking forward to today’s experiment.