250px-Foxplaza3.jpgHey, remember that wire report we ran over the weekend about a woman said to have fallen from Fox Plaza? About that…

Apparently, not so much. Last night we got this correction from Bay City News, the wire service responsible for the report:

Saturday’s BCN23 contains inaccurate information. After an initial police report that a woman fell from Fox Plaza in San Francisco, it was later determined that a woman walking past the building was struck by a piece of concrete that fell from the building, according to the San Francisco Fire Department.

(The Weekly noted a similar gaffe in SFPD’s record keeping last week, when an initial report from SFPD claimed the caregiver of a deceased woman has been arrested when, in fact, she had just been questioned.)

The real Fox Plaza story, at least the one we have today? Here’s the latest from BCN:

A woman was injured Saturday by a falling piece of concrete at the Fox Plaza building in San Francisco, authorities said.

Police received the call shortly after 5 p.m. at 1390 Market St.

According to fire department spokeswoman Lt. Mindy Talmadge, an initial report that the woman had fallen from one of the upper floors was incorrect.

It was later determined that the woman had been walking by the building when a falling piece of concrete struck her in the head, Talmadge said.

Police said the woman suffered a gash on the top of her head.

According to Talmadge, she was taken to the hospital to be treated for her injuries and was expected to survive.

Talmadge said she did not know how big the piece of concrete was, nor from what floor it was believed to have fallen.

The building’s Polk Street entrance remained closed off to the public today.

A building management official said today it was uncertain exactly what happened, and an investigation is continuing.

Props to BCN for dealing so handily when supplied with incorrect intel. How the reporting SFPD officer got from “falling woman” to “falling concrete” is a question for the ages, and, unfortunately, the message we left at SFPD’s public affairs office has yet to be returned.

the author

Eve Batey is the editor and publisher of the San Francisco Appeal. She used to be the San Francisco Chronicle's Deputy Managing Editor for Online, and started at the Chronicle as their blogging and interactive editor. Before that, she was a co-founding writer and the lead editor of SFist. She's been in the city since 1997, presently living in the Outer Sunset with her husband, cat, and dog. You can reach Eve at eve@sfappeal.com.

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  • somawally

    Sounds so much like The Flitcraft Parable from The Maltese Falcon:

    “Here’s what happened to him. Going to lunch he passed an office-building that was being put up – just the skeleton. A beam or something fell eight or ten stories down and smacked the sidewalk alongside him. It brushed pretty close to him, but didn’t touch him, though a piece of the sidewalk was chipped off and flew up and hit his cheek. It only took a piece of skin off, but he still had the scar when I saw him. He rubbed it with his finger – well, affectionately – when he told me about it. He was scared stiff of course, he said, but he was more shocked than really frightened. He felt like somebody had taken the lid off life and let him look at the works.”

    Click on: http://fallingbeam.org/beam.htm

  • somawally

    Sounds so much like The Flitcraft Parable from The Maltese Falcon:

    “Here’s what happened to him. Going to lunch he passed an office-building that was being put up – just the skeleton. A beam or something fell eight or ten stories down and smacked the sidewalk alongside him. It brushed pretty close to him, but didn’t touch him, though a piece of the sidewalk was chipped off and flew up and hit his cheek. It only took a piece of skin off, but he still had the scar when I saw him. He rubbed it with his finger – well, affectionately – when he told me about it. He was scared stiff of course, he said, but he was more shocked than really frightened. He felt like somebody had taken the lid off life and let him look at the works.”

    Click on: http://fallingbeam.org/beam.htm