Four Hospitalized When Tour Bus Hits Wire

This report originally stated that the tour bus struck a low-hanging power line. A PG&E spokesman has since clarified that the wire was a telephone line, not a power line.

12:07 PM: Four people were hospitalized, one with serious injuries, after the double-decker, open-air tour bus they were on struck a low-hanging power telephone line in San Francisco’s Richmond District on Friday, a police spokeswoman said today.

The accident was reported at 3:17 p.m. in the 400 block of 12th Avenue near Geary Boulevard and involved a Big Bus Tours San Francisco bus, police spokeswoman Officer Tracy Turner said.

The bus driver had deviated from the tour’s normal route and was traveling north on 12th Avenue when the bus struck the wire, Turner said.

The wire hit the windshield of the top level of the bus, then struck multiple passengers on the upper deck, according to Turner.

Five people were treated for injuries that included cuts, bruising and scratches. Four ended up being transported to San Francisco General Hospital, including one who was critically wounded, Turner said.

Andrew Smith, general manager of Big Bus Tours San Francisco, said he was unaware of someone suffering serious injuries in the accident. He said the three other passengers were released from the hospital hours later and took the company’s night tour of the city.

Smith said the bus was on a secondary route that is checked frequently for safety reasons.

He said the company’s “concern is for the safety of the customers” and that that Big Bus Tours cooperated with the police investigation into the accident.

11:34 AM: Four people were hospitalized, including one with life-threatening injuries, after the tour bus they were on struck a low-hanging electrical wire in San Francisco’s Richmond District on Friday, police said today.

The accident was reported at 3:17 p.m. at Geary Boulevard and 12th Avenue and involved an open-air, double-decker bus, police said.

The four victims, who are all in their 60s, were taken to San Francisco General Hospital with various injuries, according to police.

No other information about the accident was immediately available.

Dan McMenamin, Bay City News

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  • landtorpedo

    I’m surprised this hasn’t happened sooner and more often. As a Compliance Inspector for PG&E (retired) I had turned in numerous cable TV and phone drops that violated State height clearances from the road surface and were jerry-rigged onto Company facilities. If the violation were actually electric services, then PG&E was prompt in correcting them for obvious public safety and liability concerns. Low-hanging communication drops, however, unregulated and unmaintenanced, which are attached on utility poles below electric services are chronically neglected and left uncorrected. Occasionally, they’d be held up by illegally attaching to PG&E’s electric services with unreliable twine, which PG&E should never permit, but they do, perpetuating a potential hazard. Regarding this article’s accuracy, has it been confirmed that the bus hit an actual electric wire, and not a phone or cable TV line?

  • landtorpedo

    I’m surprised this hasn’t happened sooner and more often. As a Compliance Inspector for PG&E (retired) I had turned in numerous cable TV and phone drops that violated State height clearances from the road surface and were jerry-rigged onto Company facilities. If the violation were actually electric services, then PG&E was prompt in correcting them for obvious public safety and liability concerns. Low-hanging communication drops, however, unregulated and unmaintenanced, which are attached on utility poles below electric services are chronically neglected and left uncorrected. Occasionally, they’d be held up by illegally attaching to PG&E’s electric services with unreliable twine, which PG&E should never permit, but they do, perpetuating a potential hazard. Regarding this article’s accuracy, has it been confirmed that the bus hit an actual electric wire, and not a phone or cable TV line?