Cyclist Killed By Semi Truck Was SOMA PR Agency Employee

A bicyclist who was struck and killed by a semi truck in San Francisco’s South of Market neighborhood Wednesday morning has been identified by the medical examiner’s office as 24-year-old Amelie Le Moullac.

The San Francisco resident was struck at 7:07 a.m. at Sixth and Folsom streets by a truck making a turn at the intersection.

Le Moullac worked at Voce Communications, a PR agency located near the city’s South Park neighborhood, an employee there confirmed this morning.

The truck driver stopped and cooperated with investigators. The driver was not cited and the collision remains under investigation, police spokesman Officer Albie Esparza said.

The San Francisco Bicycle Coalition issued a statement following the crash, calling it “yet another tragic reminder of what can happen when bikes and large trucks mix on our city’s high-speed corridors.”

The fatal collision is San Francisco’s third involving a bicyclist in 2013 and all three have also involved a large truck, according to the coalition, which called on the city to move forward with a redesign of Folsom Street.

“Folsom Street is one of the city’s few designated bike routes to downtown—yet it is still an intimidating street, with no separation between bike riders and fast-moving traffic,” the coalition’s statement said.

The coalition also called for all large trucks to be fitted with convex mirrors so drivers can more easily see bicyclists and pedestrians.

Photo of Le Moullac: Voce Communications Report: Dan McMenamin, Bay City News

Please make sure your comment adheres to our comment policy. If it doesn't, it may be deleted. Repeat violations may cause us to revoke your commenting privileges. No one wants that!
  • saimin

    There are bike lanes on Folsom, but trucks will turn across the bike lanes at unpredictable speeds and angles. RIP to the victim.

  • saimin

    There are bike lanes on Folsom, but trucks will turn across the bike lanes at unpredictable speeds and angles. RIP to the victim.

  • energylife

    Folsom is super scary to ride on even with the designated bike lane. Trucks stop and park on the bike lane all the time and cars move too crazy. I no longer allow my girlfriend to bike to work because it is too dangerous to go from Nopa to Folsom @ embarcadero.

  • energylife

    Folsom is super scary to ride on even with the designated bike lane. Trucks stop and park on the bike lane all the time and cars move too crazy. I no longer allow my girlfriend to bike to work because it is too dangerous to go from Nopa to Folsom @ embarcadero.

  • sebra leaves

    Most accidents are in intersections. All three mentioned here involved trucks turning right. Right turning vehicles are supposed to merge into bike lanes near the intersection. Cyclists should anticipate that possibility and refrain from passing slow vehicles near intersections. If they are slowing down they are probably slowing down to turn, or waiting for pedestrians to cross.

    • saimin

      The article does not say who was at the intersection first. If the truck passes from behind and then makes a quick right turn, it is really hard for the bicyclist to get out of the way. Often, the truck driver is focusing on the intersection and does a poor job of estimating the speed and distance of the bicyclist that they are passing. Yes, motor vehicles are supposed to merge into the bike lane before turning right, but trucks very often violate that law.

      • sebra leaves

        If a cyclist hits a truck, as the truck is slowing down to take a right turn, (as most vehicles must), the cyclist must be speeding past the truck, otherwise the truck would through pass through the intersection before the cyclist and there would be no collision. Just because cyclists CAN speed, and weave between motor vehicles, does not mean that they SHOULD.

        • saimin

          The article says the truck hit the bicyclist, not the other way around. If the truck is behind the bicyclist when the truck starts turning, then the bicyclist has no chance.

    • PhasmaFelis

      I’d be curious to know whether the truck driver was signalling for a turn or not.

  • sebra leaves

    Most accidents are in intersections. All three mentioned here involved trucks turning right. Right turning vehicles are supposed to merge into bike lanes near the intersection. Cyclists should anticipate that possibility and refrain from passing slow vehicles near intersections. If they are slowing down they are probably slowing down to turn, or waiting for pedestrians to cross.

    • saimin

      The article does not say who was at the intersection first. If the truck passes from behind and then makes a quick right turn, it is really hard for the bicyclist to get out of the way. Often, the truck driver is focusing on the intersection and does a poor job of estimating the speed and distance of the bicyclist that they are passing. Yes, motor vehicles are supposed to merge into the bike lane before turning right, but trucks very often violate that law.

      • sebra leaves

        If a cyclist hits a truck, as the truck is slowing down to take a right turn, (as most vehicles must), the cyclist must be speeding past the truck, otherwise the truck would through pass through the intersection before the cyclist and there would be no collision. Just because cyclists CAN speed, and weave between motor vehicles, does not mean that they SHOULD.

        • saimin

          The article says the truck hit the bicyclist, not the other way around. If the truck is behind the bicyclist when the truck starts turning, then the bicyclist has no chance.

    • PhasmaFelis

      I’d be curious to know whether the truck driver was signalling for a turn or not.