Carpool Violations, Excess Speeds Plague All-Electronic Tollbooths At Golden Gate Bridge

The Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District gave an update this morning on the first 30 days of all-electronic toll collection on the span.

During carpool hours, some vehicles with two occupants are using the Carpool Only lane, which requires three or more people per two-axle vehicle, District spokeswoman Mary Currie said.

The carpool lane on U.S. Highway 101 north of the bridge requires two or more people.

A FasTrak account is required, and motorcycles, buses and vehicles with a white DMV clean air decal also are allowed, Currie said.

Carpool hours are 5 a.m. to 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays, and the Carpool Only lane is open to all traffic during non-carpool hours.

On March 27, the first day of all-electronic tolling, vehicles were passing through the Toll Plaza in excess of the posted 25 mph limit, Currie said.

The California Highway Patrol was purposely more visible at the site during the first few days of new tolling and reminded drivers through the media to slow down.

“Now, 30 days into the new tolling program, we are starting to see some of the highway speeds returning,” Currie said. “We want to educate and remind motorists that the speed limit in the toll lanes is 25 mph,” Currie said.

The educational and readjustment period for the new tolling program will end soon and CHP enforcement will begin, Currie said.

The update also showed FasTrak use on the Golden Gate Bridge increased from 72 percent between March 27 and April 12 last year to 83.3 percent during the same period this year.

Weekend FasTrak use increased from 59 percent to 74.1 percent and the average total FasTrak use rose from 69.3 percent to 81.4 percent during the two March 27-April 12 time periods.

James Lanaras, Bay City News

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  • I’d like to know how much the District needs each year in tolls. Could there be a way to raise the money through a special transportation tax (which I do realize would require a change to how the district is organized) in the District counties?

    At the same time how much would it cost to have the District take over public transit in all of the counties that are a part of the District (expect maybe San Francisco, which is too complicated of a service area [even though GGBT could probably do a much better job than SFMTA]).

    If we as a society want to ensure the future of public transportation we need to start consolidating services. By having a single system we can guarantee quality service throughout Northern California. We can also expand service and significantly lower administrative costs.

    I can imagine a time when a person can take a GGBT bus or rapid transit train from San Francisco to Crescent City. I can also see a day when GGBT is the sole operator of ferry services on the Bay. There is no logical reason for there to be multiple public agencies operating ferry services. GGBT already does a great job so why shouldn’t they be operating the ferry’s from Vallejo and Alameda County.

  • I’d like to know how much the District needs each year in tolls. Could there be a way to raise the money through a special transportation tax (which I do realize would require a change to how the district is organized) in the District counties?

    At the same time how much would it cost to have the District take over public transit in all of the counties that are a part of the District (expect maybe San Francisco, which is too complicated of a service area [even though GGBT could probably do a much better job than SFMTA]).

    If we as a society want to ensure the future of public transportation we need to start consolidating services. By having a single system we can guarantee quality service throughout Northern California. We can also expand service and significantly lower administrative costs.

    I can imagine a time when a person can take a GGBT bus or rapid transit train from San Francisco to Crescent City. I can also see a day when GGBT is the sole operator of ferry services on the Bay. There is no logical reason for there to be multiple public agencies operating ferry services. GGBT already does a great job so why shouldn’t they be operating the ferry’s from Vallejo and Alameda County.

  • lohphat

    A $0.03 to $0.05 per gallon fuel tax in the counties surrounding the bay would provide enough revenue to *eliminate* toll collection and all the administrative overhead (transponder handling).

    Gas prices fluctuate at $0.50 in some months. It would not be noticed, have the added benefit of no booths, and eliminate costly overhead.

    It will never happen.

    • baklazhan

      Eliminating the toll would make traffic even worse on the bridge. Already, the GGT fare is more than twice the bridge toll, which does nothing to encourage people to avoid driving.

  • lohphat

    A $0.03 to $0.05 per gallon fuel tax in the counties surrounding the bay would provide enough revenue to *eliminate* toll collection and all the administrative overhead (transponder handling).

    Gas prices fluctuate at $0.50 in some months. It would not be noticed, have the added benefit of no booths, and eliminate costly overhead.

    It will never happen.

    • baklazhan

      Eliminating the toll would make traffic even worse on the bridge. Already, the GGT fare is more than twice the bridge toll, which does nothing to encourage people to avoid driving.

  • LibertyHiller

    You can’t fight human nature. Drivers might slow down for people, but they certainly won’t slow down for a machine.

  • LibertyHiller

    You can’t fight human nature. Drivers might slow down for people, but they certainly won’t slow down for a machine.