monopoly_money.jpgUniversity of California President Mark Yudof today outlined a proposed 2012-13 expenditure plan that would ask the state to contribute $2.8 billion to the university system.

The proposal will be presented to the UC Board of Regents when it meets next week at UC San Francisco’s Mission Bay campus.

University officials said that this year, for the first time, students paid more toward their education than the state did, contributing $2.97 billion compared to the state’s $2.37 billion.

The state’s contribution this year was its lowest since the “high-water mark” of $3.2 billion that it contributed in 2007-08, according to the university.

Yudof said it is imperative that the state prioritize funding the system in order to preserve its quality.

“There’s no way to overlook the systematic disinvestment in higher education in California,” Yudof said at an early afternoon news briefing.

He said the university has been cutting the “fat” where it can, but that the cuts are taking their toll.

“We have actually been cutting it to the bone in some places,” Yudof said.

He said that if the state funds the university at the requested level, it will allow the UC system to hire more faculty and lecturers, reduce class sizes, increase course offerings and otherwise improve education quality, while averting tuition increases.

“These are reductions we’ve made the past few years that we think really need to be undone,” Yudof said.

Yudof said the state’s appropriations to the university are the same today as they were in the late 1990s, when the university had 75,000 fewer students. He called $2.8 billion the “minimal state funding we need” to preserve the system.

At next week’s meeting, regents will also discuss increasing employees’ contributions to their retirement plans, he said.

There will also be updates on the university’s efforts to boost funding through private giving, modernizing its payroll systems and other cost-saving measures.

“But over the long run we need stability on the state level,” he said.

He said all Californians should be concerned about the UC system’s future.

“It is just flat out what keeps California what it is today and what will keep it in the future,” Yudof said. “What we really need to do is to rally public support because every Californian has an enormous stake in this university.”

The Board of Regents will vote on the proposed expenditure plan next week, but won’t consider the revenue portion of the budget until a later meeting since it isn’t yet clear how much the state will contribute, university officials said.

Melissa McRobbie, Bay City News

Want more news, sent to your inbox every day? Then how about subscribing to our email newsletter? Here’s why we think you should. Come on, give it a try.

Please make sure your comment adheres to our comment policy. If it doesn't, it may be deleted. Repeat violations may cause us to revoke your commenting privileges. No one wants that!
  • DonHonda

    And yet the Regents backed AB 131, giving Illegal Aliens $40 Million of Legal Students’ State aid and further impacting education budget. This will only become larger every year. Say goodbye to YOUR higher education.

  • DonHonda

    And yet the Regents backed AB 131, giving Illegal Aliens $40 Million of Legal Students’ State aid and further impacting education budget. This will only become larger every year. Say goodbye to YOUR higher education.

  • Moravecglobal

    University of California hijack’s our kids’ futures: student loan debt. I love University of California (UC) having been student & lecturer. But today I am concerned that at times I do not recognize the UC I love. Like so many I am deeply disappointed by the pervasive failures of Regent Chairwoman Lansing, President Yudof, Chancellor Birgeneau from holding the line on rising costs & tuition increases. Paying more is not a better education.
    Californians are reeling from 19% unemployment (includes: those forced to work part time; those no longer searching), mortgage defaults, loss of unemployment benefits. And those who still have jobs are working longer for less. Faculty wages must reflect California’s ability to pay, not what others are paid.
    Current pay increases for generously paid University of California Faculty is arrogance. Instate tuition consumes 14% of Ca. Median Family Income!
    Paying more is not a better education. UC Berkeley(# 70 Forbes) tuition increases exceed the national average rate of increases. Chancellor Birgeneau has molded Cal. into the most expensive public university.
    UC President Yudof, Cal. Chancellor Birgeneau($450,000 salary) dismissed many much needed cost-cutting options. They did not consider freezing vacant faculty positions, increasing class size, requiring faculty to teach more classes, doubling the time between sabbaticals, cutting & freezing pay & benefits for chancellors & reforming pensions & the health benefits.
    They said such faculty reforms “would not be healthy for UC”. Exodus of faculty, administrators? Who can afford them and where would they go?
    We agree it is far from the ideal situation, but it is in the best interests of the university system & the state to stop cost increases. UC cannot expect to do business as usual: raising tuition; granting pay raises & huge bonuses during a weak economy that has sapped state revenues & individual Californians’ income.
    There is no question the necessary realignments with economic reality are painful. Regent Chairwoman Lansing can bridge the public trust gap with reassurances that salaries & costs reflect California’s ability to pay. The sky above UC will not fall when Chancellor Birgeneau is ousted.

    Opinions? Email the UC Board of Regents marsha.kelman@ucop.edu

  • Moravecglobal

    University of California hijack’s our kids’ futures: student loan debt. I love University of California (UC) having been student & lecturer. But today I am concerned that at times I do not recognize the UC I love. Like so many I am deeply disappointed by the pervasive failures of Regent Chairwoman Lansing, President Yudof, Chancellor Birgeneau from holding the line on rising costs & tuition increases. Paying more is not a better education.
    Californians are reeling from 19% unemployment (includes: those forced to work part time; those no longer searching), mortgage defaults, loss of unemployment benefits. And those who still have jobs are working longer for less. Faculty wages must reflect California’s ability to pay, not what others are paid.
    Current pay increases for generously paid University of California Faculty is arrogance. Instate tuition consumes 14% of Ca. Median Family Income!
    Paying more is not a better education. UC Berkeley(# 70 Forbes) tuition increases exceed the national average rate of increases. Chancellor Birgeneau has molded Cal. into the most expensive public university.
    UC President Yudof, Cal. Chancellor Birgeneau($450,000 salary) dismissed many much needed cost-cutting options. They did not consider freezing vacant faculty positions, increasing class size, requiring faculty to teach more classes, doubling the time between sabbaticals, cutting & freezing pay & benefits for chancellors & reforming pensions & the health benefits.
    They said such faculty reforms “would not be healthy for UC”. Exodus of faculty, administrators? Who can afford them and where would they go?
    We agree it is far from the ideal situation, but it is in the best interests of the university system & the state to stop cost increases. UC cannot expect to do business as usual: raising tuition; granting pay raises & huge bonuses during a weak economy that has sapped state revenues & individual Californians’ income.
    There is no question the necessary realignments with economic reality are painful. Regent Chairwoman Lansing can bridge the public trust gap with reassurances that salaries & costs reflect California’s ability to pay. The sky above UC will not fall when Chancellor Birgeneau is ousted.

    Opinions? Email the UC Board of Regents marsha.kelman@ucop.edu