uc_color_logo.jpgThe University of California Board of Regents announced today that it is canceling its meetings in San Francisco this week because of “credible intelligence” indicating that violence was possible.

The regents’ announcement follows criticism that University of California at Berkeley police were overly aggressive in responding to “Occupy Cal” protests on Wednesday that drew thousands of people and resulted in dozens of arrests.

UC regents were scheduled to meet at UC San Francisco’s Mission Bay campus on Wednesday and Thursday.

But Board of Regents chair Sherry Lansing, vice chair Bruce Varner and UC President Mark Yudof said in a statement today that “late last week, University of California law enforcement officials came to us with concerns about credible intelligence they had collected in advance of the Board of Regents meeting.”

“From various sources, they had received information indicating that rogue elements intent on violence and confrontation with UC public safety officers were planning to attach themselves to peaceful demonstrations expected to occur at the meeting,” they said.

Lansing, Varner and Yudof said it appears there was a real danger of “significant violence and vandalism.”

“They have advised us further that this violence could place at risk members of the public, students lawfully gathered to voice concerns over tuition levels and any other issues … They recommended to us, in the strongest of terms, that we cancel or postpone the meeting as scheduled,” the statement read.

They said the meeting would be rescheduled, possibly at another venue, and that they would announce the date as soon as possible.

They declined to disclose details about the intelligence or the potential violence.

The agenda for this week’s meeting included updates from UC staff members on several initiatives that have been launched in an effort to offset state disinvestment in the university and provide alternate revenue streams beyond tuition and taxpayer support.
They said that work will continue to go forward and “contrary to some public misperceptions, a tuition increase was never a part of the agenda for this meeting.”

Jeff Shuttleworth, Bay City News

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  • Moravecglobal

    UC Berkeley Chancellor Birgeneau recommends additional increases in tuition for 2012-13. Fire Chancellor Birgeneaqu. Californians are reeling from 19% unemployment (includes: those forced to work part time; those no longer searching), mortgage defaults, loss of unemployment benefits. And those who still have jobs are working longer for less. Faculty wages must reflect California’s ability to pay, not what others are paid.
    Current pay increases for generously paid University of California Faculty is arrogance. Instate tuition consumes 14% of Ca. Median Family Income!
    Paying more is not a better education. UC Berkeley(# 70 Forbes) tuition increases exceed the national average rate of increases. Chancellor Birgeneau has molded Cal. into the most expensive public university.
    UC President Yudof, Cal. Chancellor Birgeneau($450,000 salary) dismissed many much needed cost-cutting options. They did not consider freezing vacant faculty positions, increasing class size, requiring faculty to teach more classes, doubling the time between sabbaticals, cutting & freezing pay & benefits for chancellors & reforming pensions & the health benefits.
    They said such faculty reforms “would not be healthy for UC”. Exodus of faculty, administrators? Who can afford them and where would they go?
    We agree it is far from the ideal situation, but it is in the best interests of the university system & the state to stop cost increases. UC cannot expect to do business as usual: raising tuition; granting pay raises & huge bonuses during a weak economy that has sapped state revenues & individual Californians’ income.
    There is no question the necessary realignments with economic reality are painful. Regent Chairwoman Lansing can bridge the public trust gap with reassurances that salaries & costs reflect California’s ability to pay. The sky above UC will not fall when Chancellor Birgeneau is ousted.

    Opinions? Email the UC Board of Regents marsha.kelman@ucop.edu

  • Moravecglobal

    UC Berkeley Chancellor Birgeneau recommends additional increases in tuition for 2012-13. Fire Chancellor Birgeneaqu. Californians are reeling from 19% unemployment (includes: those forced to work part time; those no longer searching), mortgage defaults, loss of unemployment benefits. And those who still have jobs are working longer for less. Faculty wages must reflect California’s ability to pay, not what others are paid.
    Current pay increases for generously paid University of California Faculty is arrogance. Instate tuition consumes 14% of Ca. Median Family Income!
    Paying more is not a better education. UC Berkeley(# 70 Forbes) tuition increases exceed the national average rate of increases. Chancellor Birgeneau has molded Cal. into the most expensive public university.
    UC President Yudof, Cal. Chancellor Birgeneau($450,000 salary) dismissed many much needed cost-cutting options. They did not consider freezing vacant faculty positions, increasing class size, requiring faculty to teach more classes, doubling the time between sabbaticals, cutting & freezing pay & benefits for chancellors & reforming pensions & the health benefits.
    They said such faculty reforms “would not be healthy for UC”. Exodus of faculty, administrators? Who can afford them and where would they go?
    We agree it is far from the ideal situation, but it is in the best interests of the university system & the state to stop cost increases. UC cannot expect to do business as usual: raising tuition; granting pay raises & huge bonuses during a weak economy that has sapped state revenues & individual Californians’ income.
    There is no question the necessary realignments with economic reality are painful. Regent Chairwoman Lansing can bridge the public trust gap with reassurances that salaries & costs reflect California’s ability to pay. The sky above UC will not fall when Chancellor Birgeneau is ousted.

    Opinions? Email the UC Board of Regents marsha.kelman@ucop.edu