vote_lede_template.jpgIt’s now official.

San Francisco’s Department of Elections today certified the results of the Nov. 8 election, officially declaring Ed Lee the winner of the mayor’s race, George Gascon the winner of the district attorney’s race, and Ross Mirkarimi the winner of the sheriff’s race.

The department also announced the final results for the eight propositions on the ballot, including the reversal of the outcome on Proposition H, a non-binding measure about neighborhood schools.

Prop H, which encouraged the San Francisco Unified School District to change its school assignment process to give the highest priority in the process to students who live closest to each school, was passing by a couple of hundred votes in the days after the election.

However, when all 193,000-plus votes were counted, the measure was defeated, with the “no” votes squeaking ahead by a mere 115 ballots.

The rest of the measures decided on the ballot weren’t in doubt after election night.

Voters approved bonds to improve the city’s schools and roads, as well as a plan to revamp the pension system for city workers.

A more drastic change to the pension system was defeated, as were a sales tax, a measure to give the Board of Supervisors and mayor the ability to repeal or amend certain voter-approved initiatives, and another that sought to redefine the term “campaign consultant” in the city’s election law.

Lee defeated Supervisor John Avalos 60 percent to 40 percent after 12 rounds of ranked-choice voting in the 16-candidate mayoral field.

Gascon defeated former police commissioner and criminal justice scholar David Onek 62 percent to 38 percent, while Mirkarimi beat sheriff’s Capt. Paul Miyamoto 53 percent to 47 percent.

Dan McMenamin, Bay City News

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  • reeh

    FBI agents got caught committing voter fraud in Cincinnati.
    Leonard Gates was committing voter fraud for the FBI.
    He says the FBI is committing voter fraud throughout the United States.
    see
    http://www.thelandesreport.com/Donsanto.htm
    Excerpt from Nov 1996, Pandora’s Black Box by Philip M. O’Halloran of Relevance, The Cincinnati Election Wiretapping Scandal:

    Lewis and other skeptics of the vote-fixing scenario like to insist that there has never been any evidence of a “conspiracy” to fix elections by computer. But then, most of those we interviewed on both sides of the issue had never heard of the case of Leonard Gates of Cincinnati, Ohio. An employee of the Cincinnati Bell telephone company, Gates was watching a local t.v. news story, in which a Cincinnati man named Jim Condit was charging that the election system was vulnerable to vote fraud in the Hamilton county election process.

    He based his charges on his experience as a candidate for city council in 1979, when, after an election night computer crash, Condit and seven other “feisty challengers” had suddenly “fallen to the very bottom of the heap” of 26 candidates. Gates called the station and later contacted Mr. Condit, telling him he knew firsthand how his votes were robbed. They met and shared information and ultimately Gates testified in Condit’s Cincinnatus PAC (political action committee) lawsuit against the Hamilton County Board of Elections.

    The suit had earlier been decided against the plaintiffs and Gates took the stand during the appeal. He swore under oath that he was ordered by his Cincinnati Bell superiors to wiretap the election headquarters’ phones lines to provide a link-up between the county’s vote-counting computers and parties unknown on another phone line somewhere in California.

    The following are excerpts from the Cincinnati Post of October, 30th, 1987:

    Cincinnati Bell security supervisors ordered wire-taps installed on county computers before elections in the late 1970s and early 1980s that could have allowed vote totals to be altered, a former Bell employee says in a sworn court document.

    Leonard Gates, a 23-year Cincinnati Bell employee until he was fired in 1986, claims in a deposition filed Thursday in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court to have installed the wire-taps. Cincinnati Bell officials denied Gates’ allegations that are part of a six-year-old civil suit that contends the elections computer is subject o manipulation and fraud.

    Gates claims a security supervisor for the telephone company told him in 1979 that the firm had obtained a computer program through the FBI that gave it access to the county computer used to count votes. [Emphasis added].

    The FBI refused comment and Cincinnati Bell spokesmen vehemently denied the allegations, claiming Gates was a “disgruntled ex-employee”, yet, according to Condit, the company ultimately admitted that one of its vans was involved in the wiretapping, although it claimed they were commandeered without the company’s knowledge. The Post continued:

    In the deposition, Gates claims he first installed a wire-tap on a telephone line to the county computers before the 1977 election at the instruction of James West, a Bell security supervisor.

    Gates contends both West and Peter Gabor, security director, told him to install wire-taps in subsequent elections. Both men declined comment Thursday.

    In the 1979 election, which is the focus of the deposition – Gates said he received instructions in the mail from West about installing wire-taps on county computers in the County Administration Building at Court and Main streets.

    The wire-taps were installed on the eve of the election at Cincinnati Bell’s switching control center at Seventh and Elm Streets and terminated in a conference room in the building, Gates alleges.

    In the deposition, Gates described in great technical detail installation of the wire-taps.

    At about 8:30 p.m. on election day – Nov. 6, 1979 – Gates said he was called by West and told something had gone wrong, causing the elections computer to malfunction. At West’s instructions, Gates said he removed the taps.

    The elections computer shutdown for two hours on election evening due to what was believed to be a power failure, Condit Sr. has said.

    Gates said West told him they “had the ability to actually alter what was being done with the votes.”

    Gates said West told him the Board of elections did not know about the taps and that the computer program for the elections computer “was obtained out of California, and that the programming had been obtained through the FBI…”

    Shortly after the 1979 election, Gates said he met with the late Richard Dugan, former Cincinnati Bell president, to express his concerns that the wire-taps were done without a court order.

    “Mr. Dugan said it was a very gray area… This was just small compared to what was going on. He told me just, if I had a problem, to talk to him and everything would be okay, but everything was under control,” Gates said [Emphasis added].

    [Editor’s Note: This scandal’s alleged FBI connection raises the possibility of U.S. law enforcement and/or intelligence involvement in electronic vote-rigging.]

    Another Cincinnati Bell employee, named Bob Draise, admitted to being involved in a second phase of the illegal operation, which involved wiretapping several prominent Cincinnati political figures including a crusader against pornography named Keating and the Hamilton County commissioner, Allen Paul.

    Jim Condit told Relevance that, as a result of the ensuing scandal, Draise was convicted and five Cincinnati police officers, who were allegedly involved in the wiretapping operation, abruptly resigned. The alleged involvement of the FBI was never pursued and the Bureau itself did not follow up on the Gates allegations. In spite of all the evidence, the appeal by the plaintiff failed and the issue was laid to rest.

  • reeh

    FBI agents got caught committing voter fraud in Cincinnati.
    Leonard Gates was committing voter fraud for the FBI.
    He says the FBI is committing voter fraud throughout the United States.
    see
    http://www.thelandesreport.com/Donsanto.htm
    Excerpt from Nov 1996, Pandora’s Black Box by Philip M. O’Halloran of Relevance, The Cincinnati Election Wiretapping Scandal:

    Lewis and other skeptics of the vote-fixing scenario like to insist that there has never been any evidence of a “conspiracy” to fix elections by computer. But then, most of those we interviewed on both sides of the issue had never heard of the case of Leonard Gates of Cincinnati, Ohio. An employee of the Cincinnati Bell telephone company, Gates was watching a local t.v. news story, in which a Cincinnati man named Jim Condit was charging that the election system was vulnerable to vote fraud in the Hamilton county election process.

    He based his charges on his experience as a candidate for city council in 1979, when, after an election night computer crash, Condit and seven other “feisty challengers” had suddenly “fallen to the very bottom of the heap” of 26 candidates. Gates called the station and later contacted Mr. Condit, telling him he knew firsthand how his votes were robbed. They met and shared information and ultimately Gates testified in Condit’s Cincinnatus PAC (political action committee) lawsuit against the Hamilton County Board of Elections.

    The suit had earlier been decided against the plaintiffs and Gates took the stand during the appeal. He swore under oath that he was ordered by his Cincinnati Bell superiors to wiretap the election headquarters’ phones lines to provide a link-up between the county’s vote-counting computers and parties unknown on another phone line somewhere in California.

    The following are excerpts from the Cincinnati Post of October, 30th, 1987:

    Cincinnati Bell security supervisors ordered wire-taps installed on county computers before elections in the late 1970s and early 1980s that could have allowed vote totals to be altered, a former Bell employee says in a sworn court document.

    Leonard Gates, a 23-year Cincinnati Bell employee until he was fired in 1986, claims in a deposition filed Thursday in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court to have installed the wire-taps. Cincinnati Bell officials denied Gates’ allegations that are part of a six-year-old civil suit that contends the elections computer is subject o manipulation and fraud.

    Gates claims a security supervisor for the telephone company told him in 1979 that the firm had obtained a computer program through the FBI that gave it access to the county computer used to count votes. [Emphasis added].

    The FBI refused comment and Cincinnati Bell spokesmen vehemently denied the allegations, claiming Gates was a “disgruntled ex-employee”, yet, according to Condit, the company ultimately admitted that one of its vans was involved in the wiretapping, although it claimed they were commandeered without the company’s knowledge. The Post continued:

    In the deposition, Gates claims he first installed a wire-tap on a telephone line to the county computers before the 1977 election at the instruction of James West, a Bell security supervisor.

    Gates contends both West and Peter Gabor, security director, told him to install wire-taps in subsequent elections. Both men declined comment Thursday.

    In the 1979 election, which is the focus of the deposition – Gates said he received instructions in the mail from West about installing wire-taps on county computers in the County Administration Building at Court and Main streets.

    The wire-taps were installed on the eve of the election at Cincinnati Bell’s switching control center at Seventh and Elm Streets and terminated in a conference room in the building, Gates alleges.

    In the deposition, Gates described in great technical detail installation of the wire-taps.

    At about 8:30 p.m. on election day – Nov. 6, 1979 – Gates said he was called by West and told something had gone wrong, causing the elections computer to malfunction. At West’s instructions, Gates said he removed the taps.

    The elections computer shutdown for two hours on election evening due to what was believed to be a power failure, Condit Sr. has said.

    Gates said West told him they “had the ability to actually alter what was being done with the votes.”

    Gates said West told him the Board of elections did not know about the taps and that the computer program for the elections computer “was obtained out of California, and that the programming had been obtained through the FBI…”

    Shortly after the 1979 election, Gates said he met with the late Richard Dugan, former Cincinnati Bell president, to express his concerns that the wire-taps were done without a court order.

    “Mr. Dugan said it was a very gray area… This was just small compared to what was going on. He told me just, if I had a problem, to talk to him and everything would be okay, but everything was under control,” Gates said [Emphasis added].

    [Editor’s Note: This scandal’s alleged FBI connection raises the possibility of U.S. law enforcement and/or intelligence involvement in electronic vote-rigging.]

    Another Cincinnati Bell employee, named Bob Draise, admitted to being involved in a second phase of the illegal operation, which involved wiretapping several prominent Cincinnati political figures including a crusader against pornography named Keating and the Hamilton County commissioner, Allen Paul.

    Jim Condit told Relevance that, as a result of the ensuing scandal, Draise was convicted and five Cincinnati police officers, who were allegedly involved in the wiretapping operation, abruptly resigned. The alleged involvement of the FBI was never pursued and the Bureau itself did not follow up on the Gates allegations. In spite of all the evidence, the appeal by the plaintiff failed and the issue was laid to rest.