10:26 PM: Police have dismantled an encampment at the University of California at Berkeley tonight and protesters continue to hold their ground.

Officers in riot gear forced their way through a crowd of demonstrators who were chanting “peaceful protest” and “Who’s university? Our university” at around 9:30 p.m.

Protesters said more people were arrested tonight in the second confrontation with police.

Earlier today, at around 3:40 p.m., dozens of police pushed their way through a human chain using their batons and began taking the tents down, leading to scuffles between police and protesters.

Six people had been arrested as of 7 p.m. and protesters were reporting that some demonstrators were injured during the police raid.

Shortly before 4 p.m., police withdrew and the protesters quickly reestablished an encampment.

University officials told the protesters they could use the site as a gathering spot for the week but could not camp out.

Protesters tonight continue to face off with police who are standing in front of Sproul Hall.

9:32 PM: Protesters at the University of California at Berkeley are standing their ground tonight after university officials offered a compromise.

Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Harry le Grande addressed the protesters who had erected tents in front of Sproul Hall earlier this afternoon after a noon rally and march to protest tuition and fee increases for university students and funding cuts to all levels of public education.

Grande told the protesters they could use the site as a gathering spot 24/7 for this week with several conditions, including that protesters do not camp out–tents, sleeping bags, and sleeping are not allowed, a university spokeswoman and protesters said.

One protester said the vice chancellor’s address tonight was not a proposal or a compromise. “These things imply there’s some sort of negotiation going on, which there’s not,” protester Callie Maidhof said. “There’s no negotiations, it was a threat.”
“They didn’t offer to negotiate and we didn’t come to negotiate,” she said.

Maidhof said the group plans to stay there all night and are seeing support from “Occupy Oakland” in the form of people, tents and supplies.

Earlier this afternoon, at around 3:40 p.m., dozens of police in riot gear pushed their way through the human chain using their batons and began taking the tents down, leading to scuffles between police and protesters.

Six people had been arrested as of 7 p.m. and protesters were reporting that some demonstrators were injured during the police raid.

Shortly before 4 p.m., police withdrew and the protesters quickly reestablished an encampment.

As of 8 p.m. there were about nine tents set up on the lawn and hundreds of protesters were gathered. Speakers were calling on the crowd to create a “permanent soft blockade” around the tents to protect the encampment and a lawyer gave out the number for the National Lawyers Guild in case of arrests.

University spokeswoman Rachel Gilmore said UC Berkeley police will decide what action to take if the protesters refuse to dismantle the encampment tonight.

“We made it clear that tents are not allowed so they’re fully aware at this point that they’re subject to arrest,” she said.

7:30 PM: University of California at Berkeley officials addressed hundreds of protesters this evening and offered a compromise, which was met with a negative response, a university spokeswoman said.

Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs Harry le Grande addressed the protesters who had erected tents in front of Sproul Hall earlier this afternoon after a noon rally and march to protest tuition and fee increases for university students and funding cuts to all levels of public education.

The demonstration is intended to be in the style of “Occupy Wall Street,” “Occupy Oakland” and similar protests, and participants planned to set up an encampment that would stand for at least a day.

However, around 3:40 p.m., dozens of police in riot gear pushed their way through the human chain using their batons and began taking the tents down, leading to scuffles between police and protesters.

Six protesters had been arrested as of 7 p.m.

Police withdrew shortly before 4 p.m. after dismantling all but two of the tents and the protesters quickly reestablished a small encampment.

Le Grande told the protesters this evening they could use the site as a gathering spot 24/7 for the week on the condition that they do not camp out–tents are not allowed.

“There was an immediate response that was negative,” university spokeswoman Janet Gilmore said.

Gilmore said the protesters are discussing the proposition and will vote on their final decision.

UC Berkeley police will decide what action to take if the protesters refuse to dismantle the encampment, Gilmore said.

“We made it clear that tents are not allowed so they’re fully aware at this point that they’re subject to arrest,” she said.

Erika Heidecker, Bay City News

5:31 PM: Protesters have reestablished a small encampment at the University of Berkeley campus after police action earlier this afternoon led to scuffles between officers and protesters and at least one arrest.

Police withdrew shortly before 4 p.m. after dismantling all but two of the tents protesters had set up on the lawn in front of Sproul Hall earlier this afternoon.

The tents had been erected after a noon rally and march to protest tuition and fee increases for university students and funding cuts to all levels of public education.

The demonstration is intended to be in the style of “Occupy Wall Street,” “Occupy Oakland” and similar protests, and participants planned to set up an encampment that would stand for at least a day.

Protesters have gathered inside the remaining tents while others have surrounded them in anticipation of further police action.

The demonstrators convened a general assembly meeting and announced that they have assembled a group that will ask the administration to tell the police to allow the protest.

“Occupy Oakland” organizers told supporters through a text message to come to Sproul Hall to help protect the UC Berkeley encampment.

As of 5 p.m., more tents were being erected without police intervening.

Several Alameda County sheriff’s deputies have arrived to offer support to UC Berkeley police.

If dispersed, protesters have vowed to return to Sproul Hall tonight at 10 p.m. and every following day at 6 p.m.

On Monday, UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau sent a letter to students, faculty and staff saying that while the university supports the principles behind the Occupy Wall Street movement, camping will not be allowed on campus.

“Any activities such as pulling fire alarms, occupying buildings, setting up encampments, graffiti, or other destructive actions that disrupt with anyone’s ability to conduct regular activities–go to class, study, carry out their research, etc.–will not be tolerated,” the letter stated.

4:03 PM: Police have broken through a line of protesters on the University of California at Berkeley campus this afternoon and are taking down a half-dozen tents set up by the demonstrators.

At least one protester has been arrested.

The tents had been erected on the lawn in front of Sproul Hall after a noon rally and march to protest tuition and fee increases for university students and funding cuts to all levels of public education.

The demonstration is intended to be in the style of “Occupy Wall Street,” “Occupy Oakland” and similar protests, and participants planned to set up an encampment that would stand for at least a day.

The protesters had set up the tents on the lawn after a 1:30 p.m. general assembly, and had linked arms and formed a circle around the tents to prevent police from removing the small encampment.

However, around 3:40 p.m., dozens of police in riot gear pushed their way through the human chain using their batons and began taking the tents down.

There were scuffles between the officers and protesters, and the crowd began chanting, “Stop beating students.”

Before police moved in, UC Berkeley police Lt. Eric Tejada reminded the demonstrators that camping is illegal there.

“Remove your tents now,” he said.

On Monday, UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau sent a letter to students, faculty and staff saying that while the university supports the principles behind the Occupy Wall Street movement, camping will not be allowed on campus.

“Any activities such as pulling fire alarms, occupying buildings, setting up encampments, graffiti, or other destructive actions that disrupt with anyone’s ability to conduct regular activities–go to class, study, carry out their research, etc.–will not be tolerated,” the letter stated.

2:09 PM: Students and University of California at Berkeley employees are setting up an encampment on the campus today to protest tuition and fee increases for university students and funding cuts to all levels of public education.

The encampment will be in the style of “Occupy Wall Street,” “Occupy Oakland” and other encampments across the world that have been established to bring attention to a broad range of economic and political issues.

The camp is only anticipated to last two days, but some protest organizers said it could go on longer. Many other “Occupy” encampments have been set up indefinitely.

Tanya Smith, president of the Berkeley chapter of UPTE-CWA 9119, a union of health care workers, researchers and technical employees, said her union supports the protests.

“We passed a resolution supporting the Occupy movement and supporting their basic needs,” Smith said.

“At least a couple of members have talked about camping out,” she said. “We want to help students with resources to the extent that we are able, we certainly will be around them and with them.”

The protests began with picket lines and “teach-outs” at several locations around the campus this morning. A rally began at Sproul Plaza at noon and was scheduled to be followed by a short march and a general assembly at 1:30 p.m.

More than 800 people said on a Facebook page set up for “Occupy Cal” that they would be attending today’s protest.

Smith said protesters would likely discuss how long the camp will stay at today’s general assembly.

“I think some of those decisions will come up there. I don’t think it’s going to be ongoing but I’m not sure,” Smith said.

On Monday, UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert Birgeneau sent a letter to students, faculty and staff saying that while the university supports the principles behind the Occupy Wall Street movement, camping will not be allowed on campus.

“Any activities such as pulling fire alarms, occupying buildings, setting up encampments, graffiti, or other destructive actions that disrupt with anyone’s ability to conduct regular activities–go to class, study, carry out their research, etc.–will not be tolerated,” the letter stated.

Smith said she objects to the characterization of an encampment as disruptive.

“This is not intended to disturb anyone’s education, it’s intended to broaden education,” she said.

Protests are also planned for the Nov. 16 UC Regents meeting at UC San Francisco’s Mission Bay campus.

Scott Morris, Bay City News

8:30 AM: Inspired by the “Occupy Wall Street” and “Occupy Oakland” protests, a group plans to establish an encampment at the University of California at Berkeley today.

The “Occupy Cal” group, made up of students, faculty, teachers and university workers, as well as community members, has planned two days of action today and Thursday.

Organizers say the action is planned in protest of a potential fee increase for UC students and cuts to all levels of public education.

Protests are also planned for the Nov. 16 UC Regents meeting at the University of California at San Francisco’s Mission Bay campus.

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  • stanchaz

    America used to work The people had work. The system worked. Hey, EVEN the Congress used to work…(sometimes). God knows, it was far, far, far from perfect – but at least we all had some share in the struggles AND the rewards. But somewhere along the way, we lost our way. And now we seem to have an economy and a political system that works only for the rich. What they call “trickle down economics”… just leaves most of us out in the cold cold rain. We need to get back to what America was, and what it should be, and what it can be.  Occupy Wall Street is no longer just  a place called  Zuccotti Park –  Zuccotti Park is everywhere. You can try to pen us in, you can beat us and arrest us, you can mace and tear-gas us , and you can try to “permit” us to death….but you can’t kill an idea. You can’t keep down a people’s hopes and dreams for a better life…..a life with dignity and freedom….for us… for our kids. More power to Occupy Wall Street, as it spreads to every town and city – because  OWS is us, and for us, and by us. It comes up from the grassroots, and it lifts us up in turn. With OWS America has found it’s voice, and that voice demands fairness and justice. This land IS our land! AND WE WANT IT BACK! …We want our lives back!… We want our future back! ….So why not take some time, find a quiet place somewhere, and consider this: Each of us has only one brief life…one chance…and many choices. It’s time to choose…and to act. If not now…then when? If not you, then… who? You DO have the power my friend….and the choice is yours.

  • stanchaz

    America used to work The people had work. The system worked. Hey, EVEN the Congress used to work…(sometimes). God knows, it was far, far, far from perfect – but at least we all had some share in the struggles AND the rewards. But somewhere along the way, we lost our way. And now we seem to have an economy and a political system that works only for the rich. What they call “trickle down economics”… just leaves most of us out in the cold cold rain. We need to get back to what America was, and what it should be, and what it can be.  Occupy Wall Street is no longer just  a place called  Zuccotti Park –  Zuccotti Park is everywhere. You can try to pen us in, you can beat us and arrest us, you can mace and tear-gas us , and you can try to “permit” us to death….but you can’t kill an idea. You can’t keep down a people’s hopes and dreams for a better life…..a life with dignity and freedom….for us… for our kids. More power to Occupy Wall Street, as it spreads to every town and city – because  OWS is us, and for us, and by us. It comes up from the grassroots, and it lifts us up in turn. With OWS America has found it’s voice, and that voice demands fairness and justice. This land IS our land! AND WE WANT IT BACK! …We want our lives back!… We want our future back! ….So why not take some time, find a quiet place somewhere, and consider this: Each of us has only one brief life…one chance…and many choices. It’s time to choose…and to act. If not now…then when? If not you, then… who? You DO have the power my friend….and the choice is yours.