bart_generic.jpgAs we’ve previously reported, BART is a very curious commuter train and really wants to know what its riders think about improvements such as new seats and service changes.

In one recent endeavor, BART was considering extending service by an hour Friday nights and starting an hour later Saturday mornings. After administering on-board surveys the first two Saturdays in May, BART realized it was a flawed plan, since it would negatively effect low-income and minority riders. So, as it explains, it’s got a whole new proposal up its sleeve, one with an annual cost of $680,750, with a one-time marketing and training cost of $305,000.

Instead of extending service by an hour Friday nights, BART is now thinking 34 minutes later, with Saturday morning’s services starting 20 minutes later as well.

As the Ex reports, though many are fans of extending BART’s hours to include later nights, the amount of extra people served on its current proposal may only amount to 500 new nighttime riders and lose them 400 morning riders. Yup, that’s an additional 100 total riders, which adds up to a cost of about $6,808 per passenger added.

This Saturday, informational fliers will be posted on the morning’s first departing trains, with BART staff also available at the concourse levels of the Embarcadero, Montgomery, Powell, and Civic Center Stations to answer questions about the proposal and collect rider feedback from 6 A -7 AM.

Then next Saturday, October 15, BART’s will conduct another round of on-board passenger surveys on the first trains to depart that morning. Results from the survey will then be analyzed and presented to the board on November 17. If the changes are approved, they’ll be implemented in February of next year.

Those interested in giving BART feedback but not in waking up early Saturday morning should email service@bart.gov by October 31.

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the author

Always in motion. April Siese writes about music, takes photos at shows, and even helps put them on behind the scenes as a stagehand. She's written everything from hard news to beauty features, as well as fiction and poetry. She most definitely likes pie.

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  • Erik

    Doesn’t polling current late-night riders not do a very good job of measuring who would use the new later service? I would think that much of the people who would use the system if it ran later are currently not using it because it doesn’t get them to/from home as late as they need it to.

  • Erik

    Doesn’t polling current late-night riders not do a very good job of measuring who would use the new later service? I would think that much of the people who would use the system if it ran later are currently not using it because it doesn’t get them to/from home as late as they need it to.

  • Al

    The $6808 figure is highly misleading. The cost is per year while the riders added are per week. More accurate would be $6808/52 = $131 per rider. Which is still bad, granted. It would take about 1000 additional riders to maintain the level of subsidy the system enjoys as a whole.

    Maybe they should just advertise the 800 and other late night buses better.

  • Al

    The $6808 figure is highly misleading. The cost is per year while the riders added are per week. More accurate would be $6808/52 = $131 per rider. Which is still bad, granted. It would take about 1000 additional riders to maintain the level of subsidy the system enjoys as a whole.

    Maybe they should just advertise the 800 and other late night buses better.