pothole.jpgThis story as originally posted at 9:53 on 6/7 contains incorrect information about the approval of the bond measure by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. The item was a resolution, not an ordinance, and does not require two rounds of approval by the board. The story below contains the correct information.

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to put a $248 million bond measure on the November ballot that would provide funding for pothole repair and street repavement.

The Road Repair and Street Safety Bond, announced by Mayor Ed Lee and several of the supervisors last month, would generate revenue for street repaving and reconstruction, as well as improvements in sidewalk accessibility, pedestrian and bicycle safety, and street signals.

The approval for putting the bond measure on the November ballot was passed by a 9-2 vote by the board Tuesday afternoon. Supervisors Sean Elsbernd and Mark Farrell were the two dissenting votes.

More than half of the city’s 850 miles of streets need to be repaved or reconstructed, a costly process that involves work to the concrete base instead of just the top few inches of asphalt, according to the mayor’s office.

The bonds would raise $148.4 million for street repaving and reconstruction, $22 million for sidewalk accessibility improvements, $50 million for pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements, $20.3 million for street signal improvements, and $7.3 million for street repair and strengthening.

If passed by two-thirds of the city’s voters in November, the measure would create about 1,600 construction jobs, according to the mayor’s office.

Supervisor Scott Wiener said at Tuesday’s board meeting that the bond measure will “play a key role in keeping the infrastructure of our city intact.”

Wiener said the city cannot pay for these improvements out of its general fund “considering the 30 years we’ve neglected our roads and allowed them to fall into disrepair.”

6/7 9:53 PM: The San Francisco Board of Supervisors gave initial approval today to a plan to put a $248 million bond measure on the November ballot to provide funding for pothole repair and street repavement.

The Road Repair and Street Safety Bond, announced by Mayor Ed Lee and several of the supervisors last month, would generate revenue for street repaving and reconstruction, as well as improvements in sidewalk accessability, pedestrian and bicycle safety, and street signals.

The initial approval for putting the bond measure on the November ballot was passed by a 9-2 vote by the board this afternoon. Supervisors Sean Elsbernd and Mark Farrell were the two dissenting votes.

More than half of the city’s 850 miles of streets need to be repaved or reconstructed, a costly process that involves work to the concrete base instead of just the top few inches of asphalt, according to the mayor’s office.

The bonds would raise $148.4 million for street repaving and reconstruction, $22 million for sidewalk accessibility improvements, $50 million for pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements, $20.3 million for street signal improvements, and $7.3 million for street repair and strengthening.

If passed by two-thirds of the city’s voters in November, the measure would create about 1,600 construction jobs, according to the mayor’s office.

Supervisor Scott Wiener said at today’s board meeting that the bond measure will “play a key role in keeping the infrastructure of our city intact.”

Wiener said the city cannot pay for these improvements out of its general fund “considering the 30 years we’ve neglected our roads and allowed them to fall into disrepair.”

The measure will come in front of the board again next week for final approval.

Dan McMenamin, Bay City News

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  • DT

    And for thirty (30) years, basic services have been neglected, budgets for those departments have been systematically gutted, and taxpayers hosed so that the insatiable Homeless Industrial Complex and selected non-profits (without voter approval) can continue to dine high on the hog.

    Thank Feinstein for Sanctuary City.

    There ought to be a section in the City Charter requiring all infrastructure maintenance be current before any hand-outs of taxpayer money are given to outside “non-profit” organizations.

    Taxation without representation.

  • DT

    And for thirty (30) years, basic services have been neglected, budgets for those departments have been systematically gutted, and taxpayers hosed so that the insatiable Homeless Industrial Complex and selected non-profits (without voter approval) can continue to dine high on the hog.

    Thank Feinstein for Sanctuary City.

    There ought to be a section in the City Charter requiring all infrastructure maintenance be current before any hand-outs of taxpayer money are given to outside “non-profit” organizations.

    Taxation without representation.