parking_meters.jpgIn an effort to “reduce private vehicle ownership rates,” the SFMTA is hoping to launch a program taking street parking spaces away from regular car-driving joes, renting them instead to car sharing services.

As the Ex reports, the SFMTA is planning a pilot program in which six San Francisco street parking places would be rented to City CarShare for $150 a month, through a contract with the City Administrator’s Office. Typically, City CarShare cars can be found in private spaces like those in apartment buildings, private parking lots, and gas stations, where they are “checked” out by users of the service.

The plan, which reportedly has the support of Mayor Ed Lee and Board President David Chiu, would take four spaces in Russian Hill: at Hyde and Union streets, Polk and Greenwich streets, Taylor Street and Pacific Avenue and in front of 38 Harriet St., the Chron reports. The plan would also take over a space at Valencia and 17th and one at Clay and Fillmore.

If approved, the pilot plan would begin this fall and could run for as long as six months. Officials will then decide if it makes sense to to expand it to more spaces around the city.

According to Sonali Bose, CFO of the MTA, wider adoption of car sharing can help the transit agency “achieve its goals of reducing private vehicle ownership rates and vehicle miles traveled.”

There’s hope that by parking the sharable cars on the street they will somehow draw new sharers through increasing the visibility of the service — though some might note that the car sharing cars are already pretty high-profile as they’re driven and parked all over SF by their users.

Penalties for parking in a car share spot are expected to be $100 and, possibly, a tow.


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the author

Always in motion. April Siese writes about music, takes photos at shows, and even helps put them on behind the scenes as a stagehand. She's written everything from hard news to beauty features, as well as fiction and poetry. She most definitely likes pie.

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  • Greg Dewar

    like every other pilot program, this tends to focus on downtown and david chiu’s district, just like the electric car charging stations, etc.

    if they were serious. they’d look at this and at the integration of private buses that take people to silicon valley. both are going to use up curb space, let’s try and coordinate and not just make a pilot program press conference to make a few politicians look “green”

  • Greg Dewar

    like every other pilot program, this tends to focus on downtown and david chiu’s district, just like the electric car charging stations, etc.

    if they were serious. they’d look at this and at the integration of private buses that take people to silicon valley. both are going to use up curb space, let’s try and coordinate and not just make a pilot program press conference to make a few politicians look “green”

  • Al

    Had my first carsharing experience. Came to the intersection– cars nowhere to be found. As it happened, they were halfway down the block, up a driveway into a private parking lot, and about a hundred feet in.

    So, yeah, it would definitely be convenient and practical to have them front and center. I’m not saying they should get it for free– they should pay as much as the next car over. If there’s a lack of available parking, it’s because the prices are set so low that they encourage people to grab the spaces and camp out. It’s not the car-sharing companies’ fault.

  • Al

    Had my first carsharing experience. Came to the intersection– cars nowhere to be found. As it happened, they were halfway down the block, up a driveway into a private parking lot, and about a hundred feet in.

    So, yeah, it would definitely be convenient and practical to have them front and center. I’m not saying they should get it for free– they should pay as much as the next car over. If there’s a lack of available parking, it’s because the prices are set so low that they encourage people to grab the spaces and camp out. It’s not the car-sharing companies’ fault.