As we reported as the tragic events unfolded, 49-year-old Scott Whitsett was died after being hit by a 14-Mission bus on the morning of April 21 of last year. And now, SFPD’s investigation into the death concluded, the man’s husband has taken matters into his own hands and filed a wrongful-death suit.

Whitsett was reportedly struck on Mission St. between Beale and Main, first getting pinned between the 14-Mission and 14-Mission Limited and then run over just outside the LexisNexis office where he’d worked since 1998. He was hit at around 11am and sadly pronounced dead at 11:46am at SF General. Both drivers of the buses were placed on non-driving status and drug/alcohol tested.

As the Ex reports, Whitsett’s husband, Theodore Glaza filed the suit against the SFMTA in SF’s Superior Court, accusing Muni of carelessness and negligence. Glaza’s civil complaint cites one of the bus drivers, Kimberley Faye Johnson as being distracted by, of all things, a candy bar.

Johnson was driving the 14-Mission at the time and was reportedly unwrapping a candy bar while doing so. The Ex reports that when she saw Whitsett crossing, she accidentally hit the gas instead of the brake, pinning Whitsett to her bus and the 14-Mission Limited and killing him.

The wrongful death suit was filed Monday.

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the author

Always in motion. April Siese writes about music, takes photos at shows, and even helps put them on behind the scenes as a stagehand. She's written everything from hard news to beauty features, as well as fiction and poetry. She most definitely likes pie.

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  • Greg Dewar

    another example of how an incomptent operator, protected by the union leadership, costs us all a fortune for their dumb accident. meanwhile the good operators get nothing.

  • Greg Dewar

    another example of how an incomptent operator, protected by the union leadership, costs us all a fortune for their dumb accident. meanwhile the good operators get nothing.