parking_meters.jpgReal-time parking information for some of San Francisco’s streets will be available starting Thursday, marking a key phase of the city’s new parking program that Mayor Ed Lee and other city officials will be gathering at City Hall to celebrate.

SFpark, a two-year pilot project unveiled last year, will start Thursday distributing real-time information collected by smart meters and sensors about where parking is available so that drivers can quickly find open spaces.

The information, which will only be for select neighborhoods being tested as part of the pilot program, will be available at sfpark.org, or via an iPhone application, according to San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency officials.

As of Wednesday night, the app was available in Apple’s iPhone App Store.

Lee, SFMTA Board Chairman Tom Nolan, SFMTA Executive Director Nat
Ford, Board of Supervisors President David Chiu, and other city officials are among the dignitaries expected to attend the 11 a.m. event at City Hall, which will include a presentation of the new iPhone app.

SFMTA officials say the pilot program will help reduce the carbon footprint of the city’s drivers, who often have to circle around looking for spots, which wastes gas and increases pollution.

Dan McMenamin, Bay City News

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  • tipzimitzi

    So in order to use the real-time phone app to find an available parking spot, you would still need to drive around looking for an empty spot to pull over near your destination (since you can’t legally use your phone while driving)…then while in the parking spot, you pick up your phone to find the nearest empty parking spot?

    Why not make an app that just says, “We’re here!”?

  • dotben

    Lets not forget that the reason this data is being collected really for a different purpose.

    In addition to you being able to see on your iPhone where a parking space is free nearby, it lets Meter Nazis, sorry, DTP Parking Enforcement Officers know where there are cars that are in bays that are over their time limit. Or even about to expire, so that they can roll up just as the meter runs out.

    The net result will be little-to-no margin for being over the meter when you park – which is only going to lead to more tickets.

    Thanks SF.