Club.jpgA San Francisco supervisor said today he wants to make it city law that party promoters who want to host events at clubs register online with the city.

Supervisor David Chiu said the proposal was an effort to curb “fly by night” promoters whose events have in the past attracted violence at or near the venues where they have been held.

Chiu said the legislation could prevent “avoidable tragedies.”

The proposed ordinance, introduced to the board today, would “for the first time… provide some level of city oversight on party promoters,” Chiu said.

If approved, it would require all promoters to fill out an online registration form with the city’s Entertainment Commission. Clubs would only be allowed to work with those promoters who have registered.

The legislation comes amid other recent efforts by the city to curb club violence, which has included fatal shootings on Feb. 7 outside the Suede nightclub near Fisherman’s Wharf and on July 11 outside Jelly’s, a restaurant and dance cafi at Pier 50.

If passed, Chiu’s legislation would allow the Entertainment Commission to track problem promoters and take action against them and the clubs that rent out space for their events, including imposing additional security requirements, liability insurance and criminal background checks.

It is unlikely, however, that the organizers of an Aug. 8 private party near Union Square, outside of which a German tourist was fatally shot, would be affected by Chiu’s legislation, Chiu’s office said.

Ari Burack, Bay City News

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  • crucibroke

    David.Chiu@sfgov.org

    Supervisor Chiu,

    I read today of your proposed ordinance requiring promoters to fill out an online registration form with the city’s Entertainment Commission on the San Francisco Appeal website. Unintelligible, uninformed, and flawed are a sample of the adjectives I can conjure to describe this piece of legislation. It is abhorrently apparent that you lack any insight into the workings of the entertainment industry.

    You state that clubs would only be allowed to work with those promoters who have registered. I first ask you to define, for your public, what exactly a “club” is. When I think of a “club” I picture a bar with a dance floor and DJ. Would it count if the bar had a DJ but no dance floor? They use promoters. What if it was just a bar without a DJ? Those bars promote too. Concert halls use promoters. Club? What if an art gallery hosts a reception with a DJ? Is that a club? Is the California Academy of Sciences a “club” on Thursday nights? It has those things. What about my apartment? Sometimes I have parties that include drinking and music and dancing. Is my apartment a club? I even send out in invitations to friends. Does that make me a promoter? Speaking of promoters, can you define this too? Ticketmaster promotes events. Does Ticketmaster have to register? I got something in the mail for a Macy’s one-day-only sales event? Are they promoting? I once saw a bumper sticker promoting your election campaign. Are you a promoter? Does that make City Hall a club?

    See, I am confused as to whether hosting an event at a “club” defines a promoter, or whether promoting an event defines the venue as a club? What with the certain knee injuries you’ve sustained from this jerk reaction to the Suede and Jelly’s incidents, you must not be feeling well. Upon your recovery, when you can think clearly through things such as implications, perhaps you wouldn’t mind answering these questions.

    Thanks.

  • crucibroke

    David.Chiu@sfgov.org

    Supervisor Chiu,

    I read today of your proposed ordinance requiring promoters to fill out an online registration form with the city’s Entertainment Commission on the San Francisco Appeal website. Unintelligible, uninformed, and flawed are a sample of the adjectives I can conjure to describe this piece of legislation. It is abhorrently apparent that you lack any insight into the workings of the entertainment industry.

    You state that clubs would only be allowed to work with those promoters who have registered. I first ask you to define, for your public, what exactly a “club” is. When I think of a “club” I picture a bar with a dance floor and DJ. Would it count if the bar had a DJ but no dance floor? They use promoters. What if it was just a bar without a DJ? Those bars promote too. Concert halls use promoters. Club? What if an art gallery hosts a reception with a DJ? Is that a club? Is the California Academy of Sciences a “club” on Thursday nights? It has those things. What about my apartment? Sometimes I have parties that include drinking and music and dancing. Is my apartment a club? I even send out in invitations to friends. Does that make me a promoter? Speaking of promoters, can you define this too? Ticketmaster promotes events. Does Ticketmaster have to register? I got something in the mail for a Macy’s one-day-only sales event? Are they promoting? I once saw a bumper sticker promoting your election campaign. Are you a promoter? Does that make City Hall a club?

    See, I am confused as to whether hosting an event at a “club” defines a promoter, or whether promoting an event defines the venue as a club? What with the certain knee injuries you’ve sustained from this jerk reaction to the Suede and Jelly’s incidents, you must not be feeling well. Upon your recovery, when you can think clearly through things such as implications, perhaps you wouldn’t mind answering these questions.

    Thanks.

  • crucibroke

    David.Chiu@sfgov.org

    Supervisor Chiu,

    I read today of your proposed ordinance requiring promoters to fill out an online registration form with the city’s Entertainment Commission on the San Francisco Appeal website. Unintelligible, uninformed, and flawed are a sample of the adjectives I can conjure to describe this piece of legislation. It is abhorrently apparent that you lack any insight into the workings of the entertainment industry.

    You state that clubs would only be allowed to work with those promoters who have registered. I first ask you to define, for your public, what exactly a “club” is. When I think of a “club” I picture a bar with a dance floor and DJ. Would it count if the bar had a DJ but no dance floor? They use promoters. What if it was just a bar without a DJ? Those bars promote too. Concert halls use promoters. Club? What if an art gallery hosts a reception with a DJ? Is that a club? Is the California Academy of Sciences a “club” on Thursday nights? It has those things. What about my apartment? Sometimes I have parties that include drinking and music and dancing. Is my apartment a club? I even send out in invitations to friends. Does that make me a promoter? Speaking of promoters, can you define this too? Ticketmaster promotes events. Does Ticketmaster have to register? I got something in the mail for a Macy’s one-day-only sales event? Are they promoting? I once saw a bumper sticker promoting your election campaign. Are you a promoter? Does that make City Hall a club?

    See, I am confused as to whether hosting an event at a “club” defines a promoter, or whether promoting an event defines the venue as a club? What with the certain knee injuries you’ve sustained from this jerk reaction to the Suede and Jelly’s incidents, you must not be feeling well. Upon your recovery, when you can think clearly through things such as implications, perhaps you wouldn’t mind answering these questions.

    Thanks.

  • crucibroke

    David.Chiu@sfgov.org

    Supervisor Chiu,

    I read today of your proposed ordinance requiring promoters to fill out an online registration form with the city’s Entertainment Commission on the San Francisco Appeal website. Unintelligible, uninformed, and flawed are a sample of the adjectives I can conjure to describe this piece of legislation. It is abhorrently apparent that you lack any insight into the workings of the entertainment industry.

    You state that clubs would only be allowed to work with those promoters who have registered. I first ask you to define, for your public, what exactly a “club” is. When I think of a “club” I picture a bar with a dance floor and DJ. Would it count if the bar had a DJ but no dance floor? They use promoters. What if it was just a bar without a DJ? Those bars promote too. Concert halls use promoters. Club? What if an art gallery hosts a reception with a DJ? Is that a club? Is the California Academy of Sciences a “club” on Thursday nights? It has those things. What about my apartment? Sometimes I have parties that include drinking and music and dancing. Is my apartment a club? I even send out in invitations to friends. Does that make me a promoter? Speaking of promoters, can you define this too? Ticketmaster promotes events. Does Ticketmaster have to register? I got something in the mail for a Macy’s one-day-only sales event? Are they promoting? I once saw a bumper sticker promoting your election campaign. Are you a promoter? Does that make City Hall a club?

    See, I am confused as to whether hosting an event at a “club” defines a promoter, or whether promoting an event defines the venue as a club? What with the certain knee injuries you’ve sustained from this jerk reaction to the Suede and Jelly’s incidents, you must not be feeling well. Upon your recovery, when you can think clearly through things such as implications, perhaps you wouldn’t mind answering these questions.

    Thanks.

  • crucibroke

    Supervisor Chiu’s response:

    “My staff has spent weeks drafting legislation with feedback from entertainment industry representatives, the Entertainment Commission, the SF Police Department and others to narrowly tailor the legislation to deal with the definitional issues that you raise. I appreciate your questions, and can let you know that most of the situations you describe are not covered. We will continue to take feedback as this legislation moves through the process.”

  • crucibroke

    Supervisor Chiu’s response:

    “My staff has spent weeks drafting legislation with feedback from entertainment industry representatives, the Entertainment Commission, the SF Police Department and others to narrowly tailor the legislation to deal with the definitional issues that you raise. I appreciate your questions, and can let you know that most of the situations you describe are not covered. We will continue to take feedback as this legislation moves through the process.”