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Last fall, Lowe’s, the home improvement store superpower, started construction on one of their massive stores in San Francisco.

The Lowe’s is being built at 491 Bayshore Blvd, the very location where the locally owned Goodman Lumber once stood, and where a Home Depot was planned before the economy soured. Concrete is already being poured for the big-box retailer’s walls, but local business owners and residents haven’t given up on voicing their concerns with the future of their shops and neighborhood, even as Lowe’s argues they’ll be great for the city. What do you think?

Concerns raised by local businesses:

— Lowe’s will steal customers from local business across the city, and won’t make up for the lost jobs or tax revenue.

— Lowe’s is a big store (about the size of two football fields according to article), and the whole scale of Bayshore Blvd could be changed, resulting in more big-box businesses coming in.

— Rick Karp, owner of Cole Hardware, claims that this kind of situation usually hurts local business by 25-30%.

Arguments presented in support of for Lowe’s

— Lowe’s may bring foot traffic to the area and it’s businesses.

— Lowe’s says they will hire a large percentage of their staff from zip codes surrounding the area.

— Lowe’s possible added foot traffic will help local businesses of similar interest in the area, which sell “specialty” items of a higher quality and variety.

Photo swiped from our pals at Curbed SF.

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  • wordygirl

    Boo boo boo boo boo. I live in Bernal Heights and take Cortland down to Bayshore every morning. Where once there was an innocuous, one-story building, there is now a massive concrete slab. You used to be able to see the bay from Cortland, now all you see is this block of concrete.

    I’m assuming most people who will shop at this Lowe’s will come off the freeway. But the people coming from the west side of town who need to cross over will turn Cortland Ave. into a massive clusterfuck. It’s one lane each way, and with the light on Bayshore there is already a line of cars 4-6 blocks long each morning.

    Time to move out of Bernal?

  • wordygirl

    Boo boo boo boo boo. I live in Bernal Heights and take Cortland down to Bayshore every morning. Where once there was an innocuous, one-story building, there is now a massive concrete slab. You used to be able to see the bay from Cortland, now all you see is this block of concrete.

    I’m assuming most people who will shop at this Lowe’s will come off the freeway. But the people coming from the west side of town who need to cross over will turn Cortland Ave. into a massive clusterfuck. It’s one lane each way, and with the light on Bayshore there is already a line of cars 4-6 blocks long each morning.

    Time to move out of Bernal?

  • Jimbo

    YAY times a million. I’m pretty tired of having to schlep out to Daly City because Papenhausen can’t stay open past 5:30, or because the local Ace only carries three sizes of vacuum belts.

  • Jimbo

    YAY times a million. I’m pretty tired of having to schlep out to Daly City because Papenhausen can’t stay open past 5:30, or because the local Ace only carries three sizes of vacuum belts.

  • skiptracr

    I’m not seeing a YES or NO in your poll responses. I’m with Jimbo – 1 TRILLION times yes to this Lowes. It is a step in the right direction for an area that needs the jobs, the money and an established tent pole businesses that people will actually use.

  • skiptracr

    I’m not seeing a YES or NO in your poll responses. I’m with Jimbo – 1 TRILLION times yes to this Lowes. It is a step in the right direction for an area that needs the jobs, the money and an established tent pole businesses that people will actually use.

  • Brock Keeling

    Yes, build it. This is a city, not the small town from which people came.

    Grow, higher, longer, faster.

  • Brock Keeling

    Yes, build it. This is a city, not the small town from which people came.

    Grow, higher, longer, faster.

  • Xenu

    What kind of idiot builds a massive hardware store in a city that’s by-and-large already built?

  • Xenu

    What kind of idiot builds a massive hardware store in a city that’s by-and-large already built?

  • Josh

    For all the big items people already hop on the freeway to head to Home Despot, what would saving them 20 minutes of driving do? Compared to losing a bunch of small hardware stores? We’d lose more employers and employees than Lowe’s is going to hire. And do look up why there are problems with big box stores: They tend to hire from the community, because they said they would, and then fire them pretty directly, so they’re off the hook, and they move them from full time down to part time or less, because that’s how these businesses do business. We don’t need them, we don’t want to have to give them tax breaks and deal with the fact that all that money is going to an out of state corporation and the city having to fight with their big lawyer teams when things inevitably go awry.

    Better to find something that’s useful to the city. Perhaps an indoors farmer’s market open 7 days a week, with coolers throughout to keep milk and the like, fresh.
    Perhaps like the Granville market in Vancouver:

    “…here are fifty permanent retailers in the Public Market. In addition there are over one hundred day vendors selling a variety of artisan cottage-industry foods and unique hand-made crafts on a rotating schedule in the Public Market.[4]
    The Hours of operation are 9:00am to 7:00pm, seven days per week, except Christmas(December 25 & 26) and New Years(January 1).[5] The Market also is closed each Monday in January every year, for the annual cleaning and maintenance.”

    Which would employ way more locals than Lowe’s ever would.

  • Josh

    For all the big items people already hop on the freeway to head to Home Despot, what would saving them 20 minutes of driving do? Compared to losing a bunch of small hardware stores? We’d lose more employers and employees than Lowe’s is going to hire. And do look up why there are problems with big box stores: They tend to hire from the community, because they said they would, and then fire them pretty directly, so they’re off the hook, and they move them from full time down to part time or less, because that’s how these businesses do business. We don’t need them, we don’t want to have to give them tax breaks and deal with the fact that all that money is going to an out of state corporation and the city having to fight with their big lawyer teams when things inevitably go awry.

    Better to find something that’s useful to the city. Perhaps an indoors farmer’s market open 7 days a week, with coolers throughout to keep milk and the like, fresh.
    Perhaps like the Granville market in Vancouver:

    “…here are fifty permanent retailers in the Public Market. In addition there are over one hundred day vendors selling a variety of artisan cottage-industry foods and unique hand-made crafts on a rotating schedule in the Public Market.[4]
    The Hours of operation are 9:00am to 7:00pm, seven days per week, except Christmas(December 25 & 26) and New Years(January 1).[5] The Market also is closed each Monday in January every year, for the annual cleaning and maintenance.”

    Which would employ way more locals than Lowe’s ever would.

  • Jimbo

    One that realizes that the city is not entirely built out. The lot where Lowe’s is being built is nothing but a concrete slab. Besides, if they hadn’t razed the previous building, it would have been just stayed an abandoned warehouse likely to attract crackheads and bums. I don’t think the Bayshore residents and businesses would have preferred that to a functioning business.

    New is not always bad. A city that never changes will die.

  • Jimbo

    One that realizes that the city is not entirely built out. The lot where Lowe’s is being built is nothing but a concrete slab. Besides, if they hadn’t razed the previous building, it would have been just stayed an abandoned warehouse likely to attract crackheads and bums. I don’t think the Bayshore residents and businesses would have preferred that to a functioning business.

    New is not always bad. A city that never changes will die.

  • wordygirl

    I don’t think the issue is that change is bad, or that we residents of the southeast side of town are against any upgrades to the Bayshore corridor (for example, American Gymnastics Club is looking to open at 390 Bayshore and I think that is fabulous). The issue is the infiltration of big box stores in San Francisco, in general, and how they invariably hurt not help the economy and feel of San Francisco.

  • wordygirl

    I don’t think the issue is that change is bad, or that we residents of the southeast side of town are against any upgrades to the Bayshore corridor (for example, American Gymnastics Club is looking to open at 390 Bayshore and I think that is fabulous). The issue is the infiltration of big box stores in San Francisco, in general, and how they invariably hurt not help the economy and feel of San Francisco.

  • Slappy

    Views? Small hardware stores closing?

    Ok, people in that neighborhood need jobs. To have jobs, there need to be businesses, so build things that can hold businesses. And that lot used to be a giant hardware/lumber store so I’m not sure why replacing it with another giant hardware/lumber store is a big deal.

    People are already driving out of the City to Daly City/Colma to go to Home Depot, maybe some of them will go here instead and SF will actually get the sales tax revenue.

    And, yes, while big box retail destroys small shops through out the US, do you really think that building a Lowe’s on Bayshore is going to kill places like Cole Valley Hardware?

    Seriously, I’m downtown, I’m going to go all the way down to Bayshore instead of going to the one on 4th?

    If I’m willing to go to Bayshore, I’d be just as willing to drive a bit more to Home Depot in Colma.

    Short version: I think SF is a different enough animal that the “infiltration” of big box will be stopped.

  • Slappy

    Views? Small hardware stores closing?

    Ok, people in that neighborhood need jobs. To have jobs, there need to be businesses, so build things that can hold businesses. And that lot used to be a giant hardware/lumber store so I’m not sure why replacing it with another giant hardware/lumber store is a big deal.

    People are already driving out of the City to Daly City/Colma to go to Home Depot, maybe some of them will go here instead and SF will actually get the sales tax revenue.

    And, yes, while big box retail destroys small shops through out the US, do you really think that building a Lowe’s on Bayshore is going to kill places like Cole Valley Hardware?

    Seriously, I’m downtown, I’m going to go all the way down to Bayshore instead of going to the one on 4th?

    If I’m willing to go to Bayshore, I’d be just as willing to drive a bit more to Home Depot in Colma.

    Short version: I think SF is a different enough animal that the “infiltration” of big box will be stopped.