pge_gasleak.jpgOver at City Hall, there’s no hard feelings over Prop. 16, the ballot measure on which Pacific Gas & Electric Company spent somewhere between $45 million and a gajillion dollars, depending on whom you ask. Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi, the Board of Supervisor’s de-facto frontman for all things renewable energy and anti-PG&E, has asked PG&E CEO Peter Darbee to a LAFCO meeting, to a Board meeting, to whatever function of government SF-based Darbee would like to see in action.

Mirkarimi is over Prop. 16’s insane spending, but that’s because 1) he won and 2) he doesn’t have to rely on a retirement portfolio in which PG&E figures heavily. The San Francisco Employees’ Retirement System Board holds some 106,000 shares in PG&E stock — worth roughly $4.38 million as of June 11. Were any funds belonging to retiring or retired gardeners, cops or systems analysts used in what is one of the most expensive ballot measures in California history?

Peter Darbee, come on down: we’d love to talk to you. Just a talk!

Keep in mind that the city and PG&E still have to coexist: now that Prop. 16 is dead, municipalities across the state including San Francisco are free to pursue buying public power and using PG&E’s infrastructure to transmit that power, the scheme otherwise known as Community Choice Aggregation or, locally, Clean Power SF.

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  • Xenu

    “Keep in mind that the city and PG&E still have to coexist…”

    Not at all. We’re free — as we always have been — to kick out PG&E whenever we please. They serve US, not the other way around.

  • Xenu

    “Keep in mind that the city and PG&E still have to coexist…”

    Not at all. We’re free — as we always have been — to kick out PG&E whenever we please. They serve US, not the other way around.