Please scroll down for updates, last updated 8:35 PM

Elsewhere: Tsunami kisses Bay Area shoreline Ex, Tsunami watch at Ocean Beach Richmond Richmond SF Blog, Several beaches close because of tsunami advisory Chron, Tsunami hits California, no injuries or damage AP, Huge quake hits Chile; tsunami threatens Pacific AP, Hawaii blasts sirens, warning of possible tsunami AP, Tsunami Advisory for CA, Warning for HI KCBS, Hawaii blasts sirens, warns of possible tsunami AP, Beaches in San Mateo County closing AP

8:30 AM: The National Weather Service has issued a tsunami advisory for the entire West Coast today after a series of earthquakes struck off the coast of Chile overnight, the highest being an 8.8 magnitude quake

The weather service is advising everyone in coastal counties (that includes San Francisco, Santa Cruz, San Mateo, Marin, Monterey, Contra Costa, Napa, Sonoma, Santa Clara and Alameda counties in our area), to stay away from beaches and shorelines this afternoon when a tsunami producing strong currents and a series of potentially dangerous waves is expected to hit the coast at around 1:20 p.m.

According to AlertSF , the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center has issued a tsunami advisory for the coast of California and an Alaskan coastal area. They say that the Golden Gate National Recreation Area along with allied agencies are monitoring coastal regions, but that there’ is no plan to restrict access to beaches at this time.

According to Jordan Scott, spokesman for the California Office of Emergency Management, while the state’s monitoring the situation, it’s up to local communities to prepare. So you’re on your own, folks.

The first waves from any tsunami would reach La Jolla near San Diego, according to the West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center referred to in this AP article.

Officials in San Diego are reportedly waiting to see if the advisory is upgraded to a watch — if it is, the Sheriff’s Dept will alert residents.

11:30 AM (BCN):
Beaches along the Marin and San Mateo County coastlines are closed due to a tsunami advisory for the West Coast this afternoon resulting from a series of earthquakes that struck off the coast of Chile overnight.

A tsunami producing strong currents and a series of potentially dangerous waves is expected to hit the Bay Area coast at about 1:26 p.m., according to the National Weather Service.

Strong currents and waves up to 3.3 feet in Half Moon Bay and 1.6 feet in Pacifica have prompted San Mateo County officials to close beaches in the area, and residents are advised to stay out of the water and away from the coast, San Mateo County sheriff’s Lt. Ray Lunny said.

In Marin County, Stinson and Muir beaches have been closed as a result of the tsunami advisory, according to the Marin County Sheriff’s Office of Emergency Services.

12:39 PM: AlertSF reminds us that the Tsunami Advisory remains in effect for all coastal regions in California. They report that “the amplitude of generated waves is estimated at 22 cm for the San Francisco Bay” which may cause strong currents dangerous for anyone in the water, but they’re not expected to damage the coastline, so don’t boat or swim this afternoon, dummy.

They also say that “Ocean Beach remains open, however safety advisories are being posted by US Park Police to avoid the area until 4:00PM.”

12:56 PM (BCN): All eyes are on the coast this afternoon as the Bay Area waits to see whether its beaches will experience any local impacts of the 8.8-magnitude earthquake that struck Chile overnight.

Authorities have warned that a tsunami created by the earthquake may be headed toward Hawaii, and the National Weather Service has issued a tsunami advisory–which is not as serious as a warning–for Bay Area coastlines.

The tsunami expected to hit the Bay Area coast at about 1:26 p.m. will likely produce strong currents and a series of potentially dangerous waves, according to the weather service.

Residents have been warned to stay off local beaches. In San Mateo County, authorities have spent the morning clearing the beaches and directing surfers to leave the water, sheriff’s Lt. Ray Lunny said.

The Pillar Point harbormaster is watching for any changes in the waves and the sheriff’s office, Cal Fire and police agencies up and down the coast are working together to monitor the situation, Lunny said.

“We’re all communicating with each other and coordinating our efforts,” he said.

He said if any tsunami waves hit, they will likely begin at about 1:20 p.m. Lunny said 1.6-foot waves are possible in Pacifica and up to 3-foot waves could hit Half Moon Bay.

No evacuations have been ordered, he said.

In Marin County, Stinson and Muir beaches have been closed as a result of the tsunami advisory, according to the Marin County Sheriff’s Office of Emergency Services.

2:09 PM (BCN):National Park Service officials are monitoring Bay Area beaches today after a tsunami advisory was declared for the West Coast but haven’t seen any major waves within the first hour of the advisory, an agency spokeswoman said.

A tsunami created by a massive 8.8-magnitude earthquake in Chile overnight may be headed toward Hawaii, and the National Weather Service issued a tsunami advisory–which is not as serious as a warning–for Bay Area coastlines.

The tsunami was expected to hit the Bay Area coast at about 1:26 p.m.

“So far, things have been fine,” National Park Service spokeswoman Chris Powell said. “We really haven’t seen any high waves.”

Residents have been warned to stay off local beaches, but no National Park beaches, including Fort Funston Beach, Ocean Beach, China Beach, Baker Beach, Fort Point, Crissy Field, Rodeo Beach, Horseshoe Cove at Fort Baker, Tennessee Valley Beach, Muir Beach, Stinson Beach, Limantour Beach and Drakes Beach, have been closed, Powell said.

Officials previously reported Muir Beach and Stinson Beach were closed, but they have remained open, according to Powell.

In San Mateo County, the Pillar Point harbormaster is watching for any changes in the waves and the sheriff’s office, Cal Fire and police agencies up and down the coast are working together to monitor the situation, sheriff’s Lt. Ray Lunny said.

He said 1.6-foot waves are possible in Pacifica and up to 3-foot waves could hit Half Moon Bay.

5:05 PM (BCN):Water levels have risen about a foot in some areas along the Bay Area coastline but no damage has been reported after a tsunami advisory was declared following a massive earthquake in Chile overnight.

Waves that arrived in the Bay Area at about 1:30 p.m. have caused some water levels to rise by about a foot along the region’s coastline, and National Weather Service officials are warning that further water level rises are possible as late as 7 p.m.

Despite the rise in the water level, no damage has been reported along the coastal parts of the region.

The tsunami advisory–which is not as serious as a warning–was issued for the entire West Coast after an 8.8-magnitude earthquake struck in Chile at about 3:35 a.m. today, causing dangerous waves that were believed to have spread throughout the Pacific Ocean.

National Park Service officials are monitoring Bay Area beaches today after the advisory was declared but haven’t seen any major waves, an agency spokeswoman said.

“So far, things have been fine,” National Park Service spokeswoman Chris Powell said.

“We really haven’t seen any high waves.”

Residents have been warned to stay off local beaches, but no National Park beaches, including Fort Funston Beach, Ocean Beach, China Beach, Baker Beach, Fort Point, Crissy Field, Rodeo Beach, Horseshoe Cove at Fort Baker, Tennessee Valley Beach, Muir Beach, Stinson Beach, Limantour Beach and Drakes Beach, have been closed, Powell said.

In San Mateo County, the Pillar Point harbormaster is watching for any changes in the waves and the sheriff’s office, Cal Fire and police agencies up and down the coast are working together to monitor the situation, sheriff’s Lt. Ray Lunny said.

Tsunamis are a series of waves that can batter a region for hours after the initial waves arrive, according to the weather service.

The earthquake and several aftershocks that followed are estimated to have caused at least $15 billion in damage in Chile, according to Eqecat, an Oakland-based risk-modeling firm that estimates damage caused by catastrophes.

8:35 PM: A tsunami advisory is no longer in effect for the California coastline as of this evening, with no damage reported along the Bay Area coastline despite rising water levels in some areas of the region caused by a massive earthquake in Chile overnight.

National Weather Service officials said shortly after 8 p.m. tonight that the tsunami advisory was no longer in effect because although water levels had risen by about a foot along the region’s coastline during the day, significant water level rises were no longer expected.

The tsunami advisory–which is not as serious as a warning–was issued for the entire West Coast after an 8.8-magnitude earthquake struck in Chile at about 3:35 a.m. today, causing dangerous waves that were believed to have spread throughout the Pacific Ocean.

Waves arrived in the Bay Area at about 1:30 p.m., but despite the rise in the water level, no damage was reported along the coastal parts of the region.

Residents were warned to stay off local beaches, but no National Park beaches, including Fort Funston Beach, Ocean Beach, China Beach, Baker Beach, Fort Point, Crissy Field, Rodeo Beach, Horseshoe Cove at Fort Baker, Tennessee Valley Beach, Muir Beach, Stinson Beach, Limantour Beach and Drakes Beach, were closed, Powell said.

In San Mateo County, the Pillar Point harbormaster watched for any changes in the waves, and the sheriff’s office, Cal Fire and police agencies up and down the coast worked together to monitor the situation, sheriff’s Lt. Ray Lunny said.

Tsunamis are a series of waves that can batter a region for hours after the initial waves arrive, according to the weather service.

The earthquake and several aftershocks that followed are estimated to have caused at least $15 billion in damage in Chile, according to Eqecat, an Oakland-based risk-modeling firm that estimates damage caused by catastrophes.

the author

Eve Batey is the editor and publisher of the San Francisco Appeal. She used to be the San Francisco Chronicle's Deputy Managing Editor for Online, and started at the Chronicle as their blogging and interactive editor. Before that, she was a co-founding writer and the lead editor of SFist. She's been in the city since 1997, presently living in the Outer Sunset with her husband, cat, and dog. You can reach Eve at eve@sfappeal.com.

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  • cv

    San Mateo County is shutting down its beaches. (Article: SF Gate)

    The tsunami is predicted to hit Waikiki beach at 11:25am local time. You can watch live streaming video at Honolulu Advertiser. Looks so peaceful right now.

  • cv

    San Mateo County is shutting down its beaches. (Article: SF Gate)

    The tsunami is predicted to hit Waikiki beach at 11:25am local time. You can watch live streaming video at Honolulu Advertiser. Looks so peaceful right now.