All photos: Tim Ehhalt for the Appeal.

Per AlertSF’s announcement from last night, the Great Highway’s been closed since last night from Sloat to Lincoln due to sand drifting on the street at Noriega.

Despite the fact that a large sign was posted where the Highway intersects with Lincoln, not all drivers fully absorbed this: in the gallery above, you’ll see the aftermath of a driver who, according to the SFPD’s Officer R. Hamblen, Jr, didn’t realize that the gate to the Highway was closed until it was far too late.

The duning and subsequent closures are relatively common during the windier days of the year, so the Bureau of Street and Sewer Repair have become old hands at cleaning up drifting sand. They couldn’t confirm when they expect to be done with cleanup, and for the Highway to reopen. Some people we spoke with said maybe later today, others said tomorrow. So we’re not promising that if you drop everything right now and run down to the west side, you’ll have your own personal Sunday Streets…but, hey, you just might.

the author

Eve Batey is the editor and publisher of the San Francisco Appeal. She used to be the San Francisco Chronicle's Deputy Managing Editor for Online, and started at the Chronicle as their blogging and interactive editor. Before that, she was a co-founding writer and the lead editor of SFist. She's been in the city since 1997, presently living in the Outer Sunset with her husband, cat, and dog. You can reach Eve at eve@sfappeal.com.

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  • bloomsm

    This problem continues at a high cost to the city (over $1 million to move sand annually), until, as threatened, the Great Highway is shifted east to the current La Playa, and the highway returns to the shore that persistently claims it back. Which is why I refused to buy a house on La Playa.

  • bloomsm

    This problem continues at a high cost to the city (over $1 million to move sand annually), until, as threatened, the Great Highway is shifted east to the current La Playa, and the highway returns to the shore that persistently claims it back. Which is why I refused to buy a house on La Playa.