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1:35 PM: Muni says the accident was cleared at 1:15, and regular service has resumed.

12:50 PM: Muni tells us that “as of 12:09 p.m.” L Taraval Muni Metro service has been disrupted after the L hit a car at Taraval and 34th Ave.

“The male driver of the automobile has reportedly been transported to San Francisco General Hospital with unknown injuries” said Muni spokesperson Judson True, in an email.

True also says that the L Taraval was heading inbound (east) through the intersection, as the car passed tyhrough the intersection from southbound 34th Avenue.

True noted that the intersection has stop signs for those on 34th crossing Taraval (that is, the car in this equation), but that traffic on Taraval does not have a stop.

Until the accident is cleared, shuttle buses will run in place of the L.

Picture from today’s crash: Frank Plughoff

the author

Eve Batey is the editor and publisher of the San Francisco Appeal. She used to be the San Francisco Chronicle's Deputy Managing Editor for Online, and started at the Chronicle as their blogging and interactive editor. Before that, she was a co-founding writer and the lead editor of SFist. She's been in the city since 1997, presently living in the Outer Sunset with her husband, cat, and dog. You can reach Eve at eve@sfappeal.com.

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  • Fred

    How long until Newsom, Ford, and True tell us once again that Muni is perfectly safe.

  • Fred

    How long until Newsom, Ford, and True tell us once again that Muni is perfectly safe.

  • John Murphy

    The day no car hits MUNI – that will be news.

  • John Murphy

    The day no car hits MUNI – that will be news.

  • LibertyHiller

    One thing I’ve noticed in the reporting here on the last couple of Muni accidents is a tendency to assume that a streetcar can dodge out of the way or stop its 45 tons on a dime. Wrong in both cases, people.

    John Murphy has it right. The auto appears to have hit the streetcar, which presumably had the right-of-way. By writing it the other way around, Eve’s putting all the blame on the LRV operator, which isn’t always fair.

    But the headline “Geezer drives car into side of LRV” probably doesn’t draw as many eyeballs, does it?

  • LibertyHiller

    One thing I’ve noticed in the reporting here on the last couple of Muni accidents is a tendency to assume that a streetcar can dodge out of the way or stop its 45 tons on a dime. Wrong in both cases, people.

    John Murphy has it right. The auto appears to have hit the streetcar, which presumably had the right-of-way. By writing it the other way around, Eve’s putting all the blame on the LRV operator, which isn’t always fair.

    But the headline “Geezer drives car into side of LRV” probably doesn’t draw as many eyeballs, does it?

  • Eve Batey

    What? “Eve’s putting all the blame on the LRV operator” is completely mistaken. I specify that the LRV didn’t have a stop and the car did. Without more details we can’t say anything more conclusive, but I’m saying as much as I know at this stage in the game.

    The same can be said about the last story I wrote about a Muni accident. I tell you who had stop signs (if any), and that tells you who, if anyone, had the right of way. That’s all I knew when I wrote the report.

    So far, no one has confirmed that the auto did indeed hit the streetcar, in the same way that when (since you note my reporting “on the last couple of Muni accidents”) we published that story, no one had yet said who hit whom in the bike accident. But, again, you know who had a stop and who did not.

    Unfortunately, there’s no completely neutral way to say “one thing hit the other thing but no one knows who hit what yet.”

    But saying “Eve’s putting all the blame on the LRV operator” is inaccurate, saying I say ANYTHING about how quickly anything can stop suggests you haven’t read the stories we’ve written, and suggesting we headline things the way we do with no regard for the truth (as we know it) is just plain shitty.

  • Eve Batey

    What? “Eve’s putting all the blame on the LRV operator” is completely mistaken. I specify that the LRV didn’t have a stop and the car did. Without more details we can’t say anything more conclusive, but I’m saying as much as I know at this stage in the game.

    The same can be said about the last story I wrote about a Muni accident. I tell you who had stop signs (if any), and that tells you who, if anyone, had the right of way. That’s all I knew when I wrote the report.

    So far, no one has confirmed that the auto did indeed hit the streetcar, in the same way that when (since you note my reporting “on the last couple of Muni accidents”) we published that story, no one had yet said who hit whom in the bike accident. But, again, you know who had a stop and who did not.

    Unfortunately, there’s no completely neutral way to say “one thing hit the other thing but no one knows who hit what yet.”

    But saying “Eve’s putting all the blame on the LRV operator” is inaccurate, saying I say ANYTHING about how quickly anything can stop suggests you haven’t read the stories we’ve written, and suggesting we headline things the way we do with no regard for the truth (as we know it) is just plain shitty.

  • Erik

    How about “Service Resumes After L Taraval and Car Collide”.

  • Erik

    How about “Service Resumes After L Taraval and Car Collide”.

  • LibertyHiller

    I’m sorry, Eve. I must be extra cranky at the prospect of three whole weeks without Stewart/Colbert, or something like that.

    I certainly didn’t mean to claim that you’re disregarding the truth, but Erik has already made some of my point: it’s a “who hit whom” problem. When one writes “streetcar hits X” it does indeed imply that the streetcar was to blame; subjects and objects, and all that.

    One could (dare I say should?) write “LRV and auto collide” when the facts aren’t clear, and then move on to those facts that can be determined, and draw whatever inferences seem reasonable from those facts.

    For example: a few minutes spent on Nextbus and Google Earth would show where the streetcar would normally have stopped to board and discharge passengers, as well as pavement markings, and in some cases, what signs are posted. That’s relevant information, because (going back to this particular incident) the streetcar had a stop at 32nd Ave, and then at 35th; from a score and more years of riding Muni, that tells me that the streetcar could have been going 25 mph through the intersection at 34th Ave.

    The accompanying photo shows a lot of front-end damage to the auto, but no damage to the LRV, so the conclusion I (and probably most others) would come to is that there just wasn’t any damage to the LRV. The nature of the damage also implies that the auto hit the streetcar, and not the other way around, because the LRV’s couplings are at just the right height to punch a really nasty hole in the side of a passenger car in a T-bone collision.

    You’re right: you didn’t say anything about how quickly a Breda LRV can stop, but may I suggest that it’s a valid point to make once in a while? I’m certain that few people realize that the kinetic energy of a streetcar is equal to the mass of the LRV times the square of the velocity. (That little exponent is what makes beat-the-train accidents so messy.) It would also be relevant to point out that generally, trains have the right-of-way; that’s been a basic rule of the road since horse-and-buggy days.

    I know that beating up on Muni is a favorite sport of San Franciscans, but sometimes, idiot bicyclists and motorists bring trouble upon themselves. That little detail can get lost, especially when Muni seems to be having a string of problems.

    Here’s my underlying theme: I believe that journalists have the responsibility to educate as well as inform their readers, and I always practice that when I’m in your position. (You’re luckier than I’ve ever been: it’s not as if you have to squeeze the story into a certain space.) With any luck, tonight we’ve come up with one or two ways to improve SFA’s coverage of Muni.

    I’m going to climb down from my soapbox and go fold some laundry, but not before I apologize again, for giving you a false impression and telling you how to do your job. Sincerely, etc.

  • LibertyHiller

    I’m sorry, Eve. I must be extra cranky at the prospect of three whole weeks without Stewart/Colbert, or something like that.

    I certainly didn’t mean to claim that you’re disregarding the truth, but Erik has already made some of my point: it’s a “who hit whom” problem. When one writes “streetcar hits X” it does indeed imply that the streetcar was to blame; subjects and objects, and all that.

    One could (dare I say should?) write “LRV and auto collide” when the facts aren’t clear, and then move on to those facts that can be determined, and draw whatever inferences seem reasonable from those facts.

    For example: a few minutes spent on Nextbus and Google Earth would show where the streetcar would normally have stopped to board and discharge passengers, as well as pavement markings, and in some cases, what signs are posted. That’s relevant information, because (going back to this particular incident) the streetcar had a stop at 32nd Ave, and then at 35th; from a score and more years of riding Muni, that tells me that the streetcar could have been going 25 mph through the intersection at 34th Ave.

    The accompanying photo shows a lot of front-end damage to the auto, but no damage to the LRV, so the conclusion I (and probably most others) would come to is that there just wasn’t any damage to the LRV. The nature of the damage also implies that the auto hit the streetcar, and not the other way around, because the LRV’s couplings are at just the right height to punch a really nasty hole in the side of a passenger car in a T-bone collision.

    You’re right: you didn’t say anything about how quickly a Breda LRV can stop, but may I suggest that it’s a valid point to make once in a while? I’m certain that few people realize that the kinetic energy of a streetcar is equal to the mass of the LRV times the square of the velocity. (That little exponent is what makes beat-the-train accidents so messy.) It would also be relevant to point out that generally, trains have the right-of-way; that’s been a basic rule of the road since horse-and-buggy days.

    I know that beating up on Muni is a favorite sport of San Franciscans, but sometimes, idiot bicyclists and motorists bring trouble upon themselves. That little detail can get lost, especially when Muni seems to be having a string of problems.

    Here’s my underlying theme: I believe that journalists have the responsibility to educate as well as inform their readers, and I always practice that when I’m in your position. (You’re luckier than I’ve ever been: it’s not as if you have to squeeze the story into a certain space.) With any luck, tonight we’ve come up with one or two ways to improve SFA’s coverage of Muni.

    I’m going to climb down from my soapbox and go fold some laundry, but not before I apologize again, for giving you a false impression and telling you how to do your job. Sincerely, etc.