BINGO.jpgJackpot! Uh, bingo: sky (or $500) soon to be limit at beloved game of chance.

Oh, San Francisco. Where public pot use is routine, peeing in public ignored , transgender hookers shrugged at and the prize limit for bingo? Half of what the rest of what liberal California allows. But that too shall pass.

In a move that can’t but help his well-publicized bid to succeed Mayor Gavin Newsom (and/or Aaron Peskin, according to some) in Room 200 of City Hall, Supervisor Bevan Dufty has, the SF Appeal believes, cornered the bingo vote.

Legislation Dufty authored doubling the prize limit for bingo games to $500 sailed through a breezy committee hearing on Monday.

But sadly, bingo games probably won’t join the O’Farrell Theatre, Hippy Hill and sex dungeons on our list of “places to shock out-of-town guests.” No day-long bingo binges in underground seedy dens of sin for us: bingo games will continue to be held only by charitable organizations, in spaces leased by said organizations.

Included are even strict rules as to how the money shall be banked — in a trust fund, a certain percentage of the gate, and the rest had better be going to the charity, motherfucker! — and bingo games will also be capped at six hours. So a breezier affair than our Friday night poker game, but still quite an investment.

(The reason why SF lagged behind the state? The city police code capped bingo prizes at $250).

And we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention committee chair Supervisor Bevan Dufty’s masterful mastery of the proceedings. Not only did he get everything through, he got everyone in and out in about 10 minutes, and got his Wizard of Oz on when he asked the SFGTV camera crews to point the lens towards the audience.

This, then, we are proud to say, is what a herd of Monday morning bingo-mad policy wonks looks like:

(Not to be outdone, SFGTV showed us their awesome with a camera angle we’d never seen before — a profile shot of the clerk’s booth, which we were unfortunately too slow to capture).

Bingo freedom, awesome camera angles — this is what makes San Francisco great, people.

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  • antfaber

    Who’s Dufty kidding? $500 won’t buy enough pot to make bingo fun.

  • antfaber

    Who’s Dufty kidding? $500 won’t buy enough pot to make bingo fun.

  • Akit

    I think I’ll stick to the church bazaar bingos. 50 cents a card for a bag full of groceries or a stuffed teddy bear is fine with me.

  • Akit

    I think I’ll stick to the church bazaar bingos. 50 cents a card for a bag full of groceries or a stuffed teddy bear is fine with me.

  • TurdFerguson

    Thanks for noticing. There are a dozen fun and dramatic shots that we don’t ever use. The framing is supposed to give everybody an “even” presentation. Which, yes, means “evenly boring” most of the time.

    Clip from an old job application:

    The primary responsibility of SFGTV is to provide live access to government meetings. In-house coverage of city hall meetings generates approximately 30 new hours of programming each week. This coverage must be complete and impartial. Directors do not use dissolves, cutaways, reaction shots or subjective framing that is noticeably different from the coverage given to other speakers. When commissions leave city hall for community meetings, the direction changes slightly; extra cutaway wide shots are inserted at a regular rate to provide the viewer with an understanding of the remote location.

    The laissez-faire approach to coverage of official meetings is a conscious choice. The flow of information during the legislative process is a “push” style of information sharing: each person speaks in turn and pushes their information towards their audience. There is not a personal or intimate relationship between the participants. Using an active directing style is inappropriate because it visually suggests nuanced relationships that do not exist.

  • TurdFerguson

    Thanks for noticing. There are a dozen fun and dramatic shots that we don’t ever use. The framing is supposed to give everybody an “even” presentation. Which, yes, means “evenly boring” most of the time.

    Clip from an old job application:

    The primary responsibility of SFGTV is to provide live access to government meetings. In-house coverage of city hall meetings generates approximately 30 new hours of programming each week. This coverage must be complete and impartial. Directors do not use dissolves, cutaways, reaction shots or subjective framing that is noticeably different from the coverage given to other speakers. When commissions leave city hall for community meetings, the direction changes slightly; extra cutaway wide shots are inserted at a regular rate to provide the viewer with an understanding of the remote location.

    The laissez-faire approach to coverage of official meetings is a conscious choice. The flow of information during the legislative process is a “push” style of information sharing: each person speaks in turn and pushes their information towards their audience. There is not a personal or intimate relationship between the participants. Using an active directing style is inappropriate because it visually suggests nuanced relationships that do not exist.